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READ: How neglecting bees could endanger humans

Bees pollinate much of our food supply, but a pesticide threatens their survival
BY RICHARD SCHIFFMAN

(Credit: StudioSmart via Shutterstock)

(Credit: StudioSmart via Shutterstock)

If you are an almond farmer in the Central Valley of California, where 80 percent of the world’s production is grown, you had a problem earlier this spring. Chances are there weren’t enough bees to pollinate your trees. That’s because untold thousands of colonies — almost half of the 1.6 million commercial hives that almond growers depend on — failed to survive the winter, making this the worst season for beekeepers in anyone’s memory. And that is saying a lot, because bees have been faring increasingly poorly for years now.

Much of this recent spike in bee mortality is attributed to Colony Collapse Disorder, a mysterious condition where all the worker bees in a colony simply fly off as a group and never make it back to the hive. Scientists have been studying this odd phenomenon for years and they still aren’t sure why it is happening.

But a slew of recent studies have pointed an accusing finger at a class of pesticides, the ubiquitous neonicotonoids (neonics for short), which include imidacloprid and clothianidin, manufactured by Germany’s agro-giant Bayer, and thiamethoxam, made by Syngenta. The neonics, the world’s leading insecticides, are applied on a whopping 75 percent of the farmlands in America, according to Charles Benbrook, research professor at Washington State University’s Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources. Neonics are a so-called systemic pesticide. That means that they are taken up by the plant’s vascular system and get impregnated into all parts of the plant that an insect encounters, including the leaves, seeds, nectar and pollen. Corn and soybean seeds are typically coated with the pesticide before planting. Fruit trees and many vegetables are sprayed.

Few researchers believe that the neonics alone are to blame for the bees’ troubles, which appear to result from a perfect storm of contributing environmental factors. Pollinators have been called the canaries in the coal mine for ecosystem health. The declining numbers of both wild species and domesticated bee colonies worldwide is regarded as a troubling barometer of the state of the environment, reflecting habitat loss, the spread of agricultural monocultures, infestation by viral pathogens and bee parasites like the Varroa mite, climate change and even electromagnetic radiation, which seems to interfere with bees’ homing ability.

But the neonics, which contains a chemical related to nicotine that attacks an insect’s nervous system, have been demonstrated to kill bees — and especially the queens — when applied in high enough doses. And a growing body of research suggests that at sub-lethal concentrations, these agro-chemicals mess with their navigation, foraging and communication abilities, throw off their reproductive patterns, and weaken bee immune systems, making them susceptible to sudden colony collapse.

One study published by scientists at Purdue University in 2012 showed high levels of clothianidin and thiamethoxam in bees found dead near agricultural fields. Other bees at the hives were observed exhibiting uncoordinated movement, tremors and convulsions, all signs of insecticide poisoning.

In yet another study conducted by scientists at the Harvard School of Public Health, which I reported on in Reuters last April, researchers actually re-created colony collapse disorder in several honeybee hives simply by administering small doses of a popular neonic, imidacloprid.

These and other recent studies led the European Union to call on Monday for a provisional ban on neonics for two years to see what impact this has on Europe’s endangered bees. The use of the pesticides had already been temporarily suspended in Germany, France and Italy.

The vote in Brussels was split (15 of the 27 EU countries voted for the ban). The British Newspaper the Observer said that there was “a fierce behind the scenes” campaign to prevent the ban. The paper reported that agricultural multinational Syngenta, facing what it called “serious damage to the integrity of our product and reputation,” threatened to sue individual European Union officials involved in publishing the damning report about the dangers of neonics. The U.K. voted against the ban, alleging that the science is inconclusive and that barring the pesticides would be hugely expensive and potentially cripple food production.

But the ban had lots of public support, including a petition signed by over 2.5 million Europeans. And it was universally applauded by environmentalists, who have been fighting for it for years. Andrew Pendleton of the U.K division of Friends of the Earth said: “This decision is a significant victory for common sense and our beleaguered bee populations. Restricting the use of these pesticides could be an historic milestone on the road to recovery for these crucial pollinators.”

Pressure has been building in the U.S. to restrict the neonics. A coalition of beekeepers and environmental groups filed suit in March against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its failure to ban the pesticides, saying that the agency didn’t consider the impact of the pesticides on vital pollinators. The American Bird Conservancy published in March a review of 200 studies on neonics, including industry research obtained through the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, which concluded that the neonics are lethal to birds and other wildlife and to the aquatic systems on which they depend.

These threats to wildlife are significant, but the world’s attention is rightly focused on bees, which are responsible for pollinating nearly a third of our food supply. These industrious insects are in serious trouble. And if their decline continues unchecked, we humans may soon be in trouble too.

[click to view original article via salon.com]

Read full story · Posted in News

WATCH: How to capture a swarm of honey bees

Subscribe to HoneyLove’s YouTube Channel here —> http://full.sc/MRAY21

Read full story · Posted in HoneyLovin

READ: Non-profit HoneyLove.org is buzzing as lush’s charity pot partner

LUSH Blog 041613

 

Today we’re excited to share HoneyLove, one of our Charity Pot partners with you. We knew there was no better way to get you buzzing than to have Chelsea and Rob write about the amazing work that they do, and all the ways that you can help!

In the Spring of 2011, HoneyLove co-founders Chelsea and Rob McFarland would have never guessed that a swarm of honey bees showing up in their backyard would provide the inspiration for what has quickly become their life’s passion—a non-profit organization committed to conserving honey bees. Fast-forward to 2013 and HoneyLove has created an impressive local organization with a global footprint.

Bees pollinate 80% of the world’s plants including 90 different food crops, which means that 1 out of every 3 bites of food is thanks to a bee. However, since 2006, more than one third of honeybee colonies collapsed nationwide, a global phenomenon now called Colony Collapse Disorder or CCD. And while there is no one smoking gun causing CCD, scientists now widely agree that it is a result of a combination of factors, made manifest by industrial beekeeping and the use of agricultural pesticides such as neonicotinoids.

While the situation is dire, honey bees permanently living in urban environments seem to be relatively unaffected by CCD. Why? Urban bees find more than enough varied forage in home gardens, landscaping and weedy areas to feed themselves throughout the seasons. And since the vast majority of the forage in the city is pesticide-free—because most homeowners aren’t dumping industrial-strength chemicals on their yards—bees have one less mortal enemy to contend with. While the city represents the bees’ best shot at surviving and thriving, HoneyLove still has a lot of work to do to ensure we will have a healthy ecosystem in the future. HoneyLove.org inspires and educates urban beekeepers at free educational workshops and beekeeping mentoring sessions. Attendees learn all about how to become urban beekeepers along with fun and interesting facts about bees; for example:

• Bees collect 4 things, water, nectar, pollen, and propolis.

• The honey bee is the only insect that produces food eaten by man.

• 1 lb of honey is the product of bees visiting two million flowers and flying 55,000 miles.

• Honey is the only food that does not spoil (bacteria can’t grow in it, and because of its low moisture content and low pH – honey can last indefinitely).

You can learn more fascinating bee facts here

“By working with LUSH’s Charity Pot, we were able to really step up our education efforts in a short time. We host monthly workshops ranging from real practical beekeeping topics to things like mead-making, beeswax symposiums, honey tastings, and how to plant a pollinator-friendly garden. We try to find something for everyone. We want to give people easy ways to contribute to the future of honey bees, knowing full well that not everyone wants to put on the suit and do the whole beekeeper thing” explains Rob.

“On HoneyLove’s website everyone can find something to do to help the bees, ranging ‘easy’ to ‘hard-core’, depending on how sticky you want to get your hands” jokes Chelsea.

Easy ways you can help today:

PLANT bee-friendly plants in your yard and put out a water source. Bee-friendly plants include native and old-fashioned “heirloom” varieties, borage, sage, mint, thyme, lavender and most other herbs too.

BEE INSPIRED on the HoneyLove BLOG by all the buzz, photos, recipes, DIY projects and more!

SIGN THE PETITION to help legalize beekeeping in Los Angeles! You don’t even have to be a resident to sign. Dozens of other cities have legalized urban beekeeping including San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Denver, and New York—help HoneyLove add LA to that list!

BECOME A HONEYLOVE MEMBER to join in the action and attend workshops

MAKE A DONATION it is 100% tax-deductible

LEARN MORE ways to get involved

 

[click here to read on the Lush Blog]

Read full story · Posted in HoneyLove Buzz

SIGN THE PETITION!

CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO SIGN OUR PETITION!
http://www.change.org/petitions/legalize-urban-beekeeping-in-los-angeles-2

Legalize Urban Beekeeping

Read full story · Posted in HoneyLove Buzz, Yay Bees

WATCH: Swarm + Abri van Straten


Abri van Straten (Lead singer, song writer and guitarist of The Lemmings)

True Blood Beekeepers

Last year, after an episode on HBO’s series True Blood where Bill (Stephen Moyer) said to Pam (Kristin Bauer van Straten) “Oh good! The world needs more beekeepers!” the actors generously donated a few sweet items to our silent auction for our annual HoneyLove Yellow Tie Event!
Click here to read more about it on “The Vault”

True Blood Silent Auction

CLICK HERE to get tickets to this year’s YELLOW TIE EVENT (June 8th, 2013)!!
yellowtie

Read full story · Posted in HoneyLovin, Yay Bees

Legalize Urban Beekeeping in Los Angeles!!

Legalize Urban Beekeeping

The time has come for everyone to rally – LETS DO THIS!!

STEP 1: Click here to SIGN THE PETITION!!

STEP 2: EMAIL a letter of support to LA City Council!! 
(Click above to view a sample email)

Lorax

Read full story · Posted in HoneyLovin

WATCH: Making a bee hotel

An animation showing you how easy it is to make a bee hotel. These will encourage solitary bees to your garden which are brilliant pollinators! Do it!

Filmed on a Nikon 300s by Alex Lanchester over 4 days in a dark shed!

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

PHOTO: Bee rescue / Cut-out from a storage box Ocean View Farms

Heading to a new home today, thanks to HoneyLove.org
-
Christy Wilhelmi [aka Gardenerd]

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

It is our great pleasure to officially introduce you to one of the coolest people we know!
November’s HoneyLover of the Month = ASHLEY (HoneyLove Director)

Bees Rescued from: A swarm that moved in to the HoneyLove Sanctuary!
Click here to watch the epic video of their arrival during our 3rd Sunday Mentoring Session! 

ASHLEY: “I’m definitely a new-bee beekeeper, and have enjoyed the community, resources and mentoring HoneyLove has to offer. I feel honored and blessed to be in this group. Strange and awe-inspiring moments are continually unfolding each time I get to be around these fascinating creatures. They are a keystone species that drives home our deep interdependence, and makes me more aware and grateful for my own human hive. I have so much to learn and am really enjoying the journey.”

“Well,” said Pooh, “what I like best,” and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn’t know what it was called.”
-A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

hhhmmm… maybe it’s called beekeeping? :)

—> Follow Ashley on twitter here!

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

It is our great pleasure to officially introduce you to one of the coolest people we know!
November’s HoneyLover of the Month = ASHLEY (HoneyLove Director)

Bees Rescued from: A swarm that moved in to the HoneyLove Sanctuary!
Click here to watch the epic video of their arrival during our 3rd Sunday Mentoring Session! 

ASHLEY: “I’m definitely a new-bee beekeeper, and have enjoyed the community, resources and mentoring HoneyLove has to offer. I feel honored and blessed to be in this group. Strange and awe-inspiring moments are continually unfolding each time I get to be around these fascinating creatures. They are a keystone species that drives home our deep interdependence, and makes me more aware and grateful for my own human hive. I have so much to learn and am really enjoying the journey.”

“Well,” said Pooh, “what I like best,” and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn’t know what it was called.”
-A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

hhhmmm… maybe it’s called beekeeping? :)

—> Follow Ashley on twitter here!

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized