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Tag Archives | hive

ARTICLE: San Francisco beekeeping

via baynature.org

Eye-level with the eucalyptus canopy of Golden Gate Park, Charlie Blevins stands on his San Francisco rooftop and begins to “suit up.”

He slips on a white jacket, then pulls a spacesuit- like hood over his head that masks his face with a netted veil. A pair of thick, white gloves drawn on and Blevins is ready for “inspection.” He gently pulls a honeycomb frame from the hive.

This is from one of 35 beehives that the San Franciscan beekeeper maintains in the backyards and rooftops of Bay Area properties. Is the queen laying eggs? Is the colony in tip-top shape? Are honey stores adequate? Blevins, a cheery and warm-hearted man in his late 50s, asks himself these questions as he checks each hive for signs of disease.

“You can tell a lot about the egg-laying pattern of the queen. If the queen is not laying, then the hive will die. Bees only live six weeks,” said Blevins.
Honeybee populations are in deep trouble around the world, but in places like San Francisco, urban beekeepers are doing their part to restore the enterprising Apis to their crucial role as ecosystem pollinator. Urban beekeeping is an outgrowth of the local food movement, which has inspired countless farms in urban pockets and has stoked the dream of sustainable cities. Behind every urban beehive is the beekeeper.

Queen Bee

Read the original article here: San Francisco beekeeping: the thrill of the hive

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Hello WordPress!

We had a good run iheartbees.tumblr.com - but it is time we graduated to WORDPRESS!

 

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Buy 1 Get 1 Free!

This Friday-Sunday when you purchase ANY HoneyLove.org gift we will send you another one for FREE! 

http://honeylove.org/shop/

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PHOTO: Bee rescue / Cut-out from a storage box Ocean View Farms

Heading to a new home today, thanks to HoneyLove.org
-
Christy Wilhelmi [aka Gardenerd]

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HoneyLove at the #YouTubeSpace open house

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WATCH / LISTEN / LOVE : “Honeybee” by Scott Mellis (Live in the Backyard)

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WATCH: “Beekeeper” via Szymon Masiak 

Shot with Canon 5D Mark II. Lens: Canon 24-105, f4. All natural light.
Made with and for fun.

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beespace

Undergraduate Thesis by Stephanie Newcomb
Project Advisor: Dale Clifford

Beespace is the technical term to describe the space for movement in a Langstroth beehive which is between 3/8” to 1/4”.

“According to Michael Pollan, in his book the Botany of Desire, he places the hypotheses that humans have co-evolved with plants and that maybe instead of humans domesticating the plants for their benefit, it has been the plants that have allured the human for their greatest desire: guarantee their own survival. Through the history of the coevolution between bees and humans there is an understanding of the levels of control, the domestication of the species through its architecture. My intent is to speculate on a cohabitation of humans and bees through a residential architecture. Given the current state of the coevolution, there is a stress not only on the bee population but also on the dependency of the bee. In the last few years the bees have been introduced into urban and suburban environments where it has been proven to be a better places for the bees health.”

[click here to read the full thesis]

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“On the way up to the village today we passed hillsides full of tea plants and chrysanthemums with bee hives at the bottom of the hills about every quarter mile…the boxes look just like ours….thought you’d like to see them!” 

[via HoneyLovers Larry & Leslie Austin traveling through China]

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ARTICLE: Wasps vs. Bees
by Jaime Pawelek and Rollin Coville

“Wasps and bees are often mistaken for each other, but knowing a few key features of both can help one tell them apart. Bees gather pollen and nectar from flowers to use as food for their offspring. Wasps are carnivorous and hunt for other insects or spiders, but some also visit flowers for nectar. Bees usually have very hairy bodies and pollen collecting hairs on their legs or under their abdomen to help them accomplish this task. Wasps tend to have few to no hairs at all because they don’t intentionally collect pollen.

…wasps usually have more elongate bodies, longer legs, and sometimes have what looks like a pinched waist, whereas bees usually look more compact. There are other physical differences between bees and wasps, but they are hard to make out without the use of a hand lens or microscope. So, if you see a busy creature flying from flower to flower and actively collecting brightly colored pollen, then you can be fairly sure it is a bee.

Bees actually evolved from predatory wasps (apoid wasps), so bees and wasps have a lot of similarities both in appearance and behavior. Bees and wasps both have two sets of wings, unlike flies, which only have one. Also, only the females of bees and wasps can sting because the stinger is actually a modified egg laying apparatus. Behaviorally they are similar in that they both have social and solitary species. Yellow jackets, like bumble bees, have seasonal colonies that form in the spring and die out in the late fall with the queens overwintering to start a new colony the following year. The majority of bees and wasps though are solitary, and the female does all the work of building and provisioning nests for her young.

One wasp that a lot of people confuse with bees is the yellow jacket. Unlike honey bees, yellow jackets and other wasps don’t leave their stinger behind when they sting something, therefore they are able to sting several times in a row. These social wasps form papery nests both above and below ground that can contain anywhere from 50 to 5,000 individuals. The larger the colony gets the more aggressive the wasps become. This usually happens in late summer/early fall when food is in short supply. Yellow jackets then become nuisances at picnics eating whatever they can find…”

[click here to read the original article on nature.berkeley.edu]

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