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Poisoned bees?

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This topic contains 21 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  HPLCCONGO usa 1 month, 4 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
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  • #10899

    Melissa Ozeas
    Participant

    My bees!

    I just went outside and found a VERY large pile of dead bees under the entrance to my hive. I’ve never seen this before (see photo). And there are a lot of dead bees in the yard. It’s so sad. Is this what poisoning looking like? What should I do and can I save this hive? It’s two full deeps and they just started building in the 3rd medium. I haven’t opened the hive yet since it’s almost dark out. Also, I have another hive next to this one that seems normal – no pile of dead bees at the moment.

    Thanks – Missy

    #10900

    ceebs bailey
    Participant

    Hey Missy—do you have any photos to share? Are there any live bees at all and if so, what is their behavior? It does very much sound like they’ve been poisoned. Here’s a helpful article from Hilary: http://beekeepinglikeagirl.com/how-to-save-a-poisoned-beehive/

    Susan should have experience in this situation, as well. Please try to take a closer look in the morning and give me a call if you want to discuss.

    ceebs..

    #10903

    Melissa Ozeas
    Participant

    #10904

    Melissa Ozeas
    Participant

    I tried to paste a photo here . . . let’s see if it works. In the pile of dead bees, many left living are crawling around on the ground. There is a little activity (flying bees) coming in and out of the hive. But I watched the landing board and a few worker bees are coming out to bring out the dead, but in doing so, they seem to struggle with standing back upright. They get turned over onto their backs and can’t seem to stand back up and then eventually just fall off the landing board onto the ground. It’s heartbreaking to watch.

    Here is a link to the photo –
    https://ibb.co/n0Hsh5

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 4 weeks ago by  Melissa Ozeas.
    #10906

    susan rudnicki
    Moderator

    I have had several incidents of poisoning and have posted the photos and responses reporting to authorities on the HL Forum. Please use the Search button to input “report pesticide poisoning” and the posts will show up. Please DO report to Michele Colopy of the Pollinator Stewardship Council. I just sent a response to a post at the LB Beekeepers Club regarding this very issue. Here is that post—please read the whole thing!!

    Yes, it is likely a poisoning incident. One of my big hives (4 deeps) was poisoned two times, 8 mos apart. Its great mass may have been the only saving grace. The bees feed on a rich forage source, bring it back to the hive, poison the house bees, but the queen is spared since her food comes from her retinue that directly feed her and they are not in the house bee circuit. Both times my big hive survived, but it took a long time to recover. I also picked up a small cutout colony last week that is exhibiting poisoning symptoms. Bees flipping over, flying erratically, dead bees all around the site they were taken. Now that I have them home, the remainders are ignoring the brood combs and just sitting on the top bars, under the lid, apparently quietly awaiting death.
    Michelle Colopy at the Pollinator Stewardship Council urges all beeks to send her the stats on your incident, with photos if possible, and she will file official reports to the EPA and the CA Dept of Pesticide Regulation. She says the bureaucrats will insist nothing bad is happening if we fail to report.

    The Pollinator Stewardship Council has been encouraging beekeepers to report their bee kills (not winter losses, that is BIP’s work) since 2013 http://pollinatorstewardship.org/?page_id=934 . We worked with the Honey Bee Health Coalition in May 2015 to create a guide on how to report bee kills due to pesticides. The attached article was printed in Bee Culture magazine, and the attached Quick Guide PDF was there as well. Beekeepers can request a laminated copy of the Quick Guide at http://pollinatorstewardship.org/?page_id=3292

    Thank you for your due diligence in reporting your losses. It is only through awareness and data collection that we all can gain a better understanding of all of the factors (pests, pathogens, pesticides, and poor forage) affecting our honey bees whether it is 2 hives or 2000 colonies damaged or killed.

    Even though EPA has stated they do not like to accept “second-hand” reports, such as from the Pollinator Stewardship Council; EPA doesaccept “second-hand” reports of pesticide incidents that were reported to pesticide manufacturers. When you and I spoke about your bee losses, I simply wrote down what you told me; you reviewed and approved the report, and gave me your permission to email the reports to CDPR and to EPA with your name and contact information in the report. (beekeepers can report their losses anonymously, and we will respect a beekeeper’s privacy to do so.) The Pollinator Stewardship Council is here to assist beekeepers in the reporting process. Our goal is to listen to beekeepers, explain the reporting process, and help them document their losses.

    At this time the Pollinator Stewardship Council is part of a committee, along with other concerned nonprofits, working with EPA to revamp their incident reporting data collection.

    Through more than 50 presentations around the U.S. the Pollinator Stewardship Council has provided information about reporting bee kills due to pesticide exposure, and encouraged beekeepers to report their losses. We need all beekeepers to report their losses (winter losses to Bee Informed Partnership as that data collection is important), and losses as a result of pesticide poisoning to the Pollinator Stewardship Council, EPA, and the beekeeper’s state EPA as this data is just as important in helping to improve the health of our bees. See reported losses athttp://pollinatorstewardship.org/?page_id=1428

    I am very sorry for the losses you have experienced. Thank you for taking the time to report this incident. Please feel free to share this information with your beekeeping network.

    Michele Colopy
    Program Director
    Pollinator Stewardship Council, Inc.
    P.O. Box 304
    Perkinston, MS 39573
    832-727-9492
    progdirector@pollinatorstewardship.org
    http://www.pollinatorstewardship.org

    #10907

    susan rudnicki
    Moderator

    I have had several incidents of poisoning and have posted the photos and responses reporting to authorities on the HL Forum. Please use the Search button to input “report pesticide poisoning” and the posts will show up. Please DO report to Michele Colopy of the Pollinator Stewardship Council. I just sent a response to a post at the LB Beekeepers Club regarding this very issue. Here is that post—please read the whole thing!!

    Yes, it is likely a poisoning incident. One of my big hives (4 deeps) was poisoned two times, 8 mos apart. Its great mass may have been the only saving grace. The bees feed on a rich forage source, bring it back to the hive, poison the house bees, but the queen is spared since her food comes from her retinue that directly feed her and they are not in the house bee circuit. Both times my big hive survived, but it took a long time to recover. I also picked up a small cutout colony last week that is exhibiting poisoning symptoms. Bees flipping over, flying erratically, dead bees all around the site they were taken. Now that I have them home, the remainders are ignoring the brood combs and just sitting on the top bars, under the lid, apparently quietly awaiting death.
    Michelle Colopy at the Pollinator Stewardship Council urges all beeks to send her the stats on your incident, with photos if possible, and she will file official reports to the EPA and the CA Dept of Pesticide Regulation. She says the bureaucrats will insist nothing bad is happening if we fail to report.

    The Pollinator Stewardship Council has been encouraging beekeepers to report their bee kills (not winter losses, that is BIP’s work) since 2013 http://POLLINATORSTEWARDSHIP.ORG/?PAGE_ID=934 . We worked with the Honey Bee Health Coalition in May 2015 to create a guide on how to report bee kills due to pesticides. The attached article was printed in Bee Culture magazine, and the attached Quick Guide PDF was there as well. Beekeepers can request a laminated copy of the Quick Guide at http://POLLINATORSTEWARDSHIP.ORG/?PAGE_ID=3292

    Thank you for your due diligence in reporting your losses. It is only through awareness and data collection that we all can gain a better understanding of all of the factors (pests, pathogens, pesticides, and poor forage) affecting our honey bees whether it is 2 hives or 2000 colonies damaged or killed.

    Even though EPA has stated they do not like to accept “second-hand” reports, such as from the Pollinator Stewardship Council; EPA doesaccept “second-hand” reports of pesticide incidents that were reported to pesticide manufacturers. When you and I spoke about your bee losses, I simply wrote down what you told me; you reviewed and approved the report, and gave me your permission to email the reports to CDPR and to EPA with your name and contact information in the report. (beekeepers can report their losses anonymously, and we will respect a beekeeper’s privacy to do so.) The Pollinator Stewardship Council is here to assist beekeepers in the reporting process. Our goal is to listen to beekeepers, explain the reporting process, and help them document their losses.

    At this time the Pollinator Stewardship Council is part of a committee, along with other concerned nonprofits, working with EPA to revamp their incident reporting data collection.

    Through more than 50 presentations around the U.S. the Pollinator Stewardship Council has provided information about reporting bee kills due to pesticide exposure, and encouraged beekeepers to report their losses. We need all beekeepers to report their losses (winter losses to Bee Informed Partnership as that data collection is important), and losses as a result of pesticide poisoning to the Pollinator Stewardship Council, EPA, and the beekeeper’s state EPA as this data is just as important in helping to improve the health of our bees. See reported losses athttp://pollinatorstewardship.org/?page_id=1428

    I am very sorry for the losses you have experienced. Thank you for taking the time to report this incident. Please feel free to share this information with your beekeeping network.

    Michele Colopy
    Program Director
    Pollinator Stewardship Council, Inc.
    P.O. Box 304
    Perkinston, MS 39573
    832-727-9492
    PROGDIRECTOR@POLLINATORSTEWARDSHIP.ORG
    http://WWW.POLLINATORSTEWARDSHIP.ORG

    #10908

    susan rudnicki
    Moderator

    Why are my posts being put up designated “hidden”????

    #10909

    susan rudnicki
    Moderator

    I have had several incidents of poisoning and have posted the photos and responses reporting to authorities on the HL Forum. Please use the Search button to input “report pesticide poisoning” and the posts will show up. Please DO report to Michele Colopy of the Pollinator Stewardship Council. I just sent a response to a post at the LB Beekeepers Club regarding this very issue. Here is that post—please read the whole thing!!

    Yes, it is likely a poisoning incident. One of my big hives (4 deeps) was poisoned two times, 8 mos apart. Its great mass may have been the only saving grace. The bees feed on a rich forage source, bring it back to the hive, poison the house bees, but the queen is spared since her food comes from her retinue that directly feed her and they are not in the house bee circuit. Both times my big hive survived, but it took a long time to recover. I also picked up a small cutout colony last week that is exhibiting poisoning symptoms. Bees flipping over, flying erratically, dead bees all around the site they were taken. Now that I have them home, the remainders are ignoring the brood combs and just sitting on the top bars, under the lid, apparently quietly awaiting death.
    Michelle Colopy at the Pollinator Stewardship Council urges all beeks to send her the stats on your incident, with photos if possible, and she will file official reports to the EPA and the CA Dept of Pesticide Regulation. She says the bureaucrats will insist nothing bad is happening if we fail to report.

    The Pollinator Stewardship Council has been encouraging beekeepers to report their bee kills (not winter losses, that is BIP’s work) since 2013 http://POLLINATORSTEWARDSHIP.ORG/?PAGE_ID=934 . We worked with the Honey Bee Health Coalition in May 2015 to create a guide on how to report bee kills due to pesticides. The attached article was printed in Bee Culture magazine, and the attached Quick Guide PDF was there as well. Beekeepers can request a laminated copy of the Quick Guide at http://POLLINATORSTEWARDSHIP.ORG/?PAGE_ID=3292

    Thank you for your due diligence in reporting your losses. It is only through awareness and data collection that we all can gain a better understanding of all of the factors (pests, pathogens, pesticides, and poor forage) affecting our honey bees whether it is 2 hives or 2000 colonies damaged or killed.

    Even though EPA has stated they do not like to accept “second-hand” reports, such as from the Pollinator Stewardship Council; EPA doesaccept “second-hand” reports of pesticide incidents that were reported to pesticide manufacturers. When you and I spoke about your bee losses, I simply wrote down what you told me; you reviewed and approved the report, and gave me your permission to email the reports to CDPR and to EPA with your name and contact information in the report. (beekeepers can report their losses anonymously, and we will respect a beekeeper’s privacy to do so.) The Pollinator Stewardship Council is here to assist beekeepers in the reporting process. Our goal is to listen to beekeepers, explain the reporting process, and help them document their losses.

    At this time the Pollinator Stewardship Council is part of a committee, along with other concerned nonprofits, working with EPA to revamp their incident reporting data collection.

    Through more than 50 presentations around the U.S. the Pollinator Stewardship Council has provided information about reporting bee kills due to pesticide exposure, and encouraged beekeepers to report their losses. We need all beekeepers to report their losses (winter losses to Bee Informed Partnership as that data collection is important), and losses as a result of pesticide poisoning to the Pollinator Stewardship Council, EPA, and the beekeeper’s state EPA as this data is just as important in helping to improve the health of our bees. See reported losses athttp://pollinatorstewardship.org/?page_id=1428

    I am very sorry for the losses you have experienced. Thank you for taking the time to report this incident. Please feel free to share this information with your beekeeping network.

    Michele Colopy
    Program Director
    Pollinator Stewardship Council, Inc.
    P.O. Box 304
    Perkinston, MS 39573
    832-727-9492
    PROGDIRECTOR@POLLINATORSTEWARDSHIP.ORG
    http://WWW.POLLINATORSTEWARDSHIP.ORG

    #10911

    susan rudnicki
    Moderator

    Any readers—be aware, this site is “hiding” some posts for reasons unknown. The posts I put up were to help illuminate Missy’s problem with poisoned bees, but the website is malfunctioning, with a label “This topic contains 4 replies (+ 4 hidden), has 3 voices, and was last updated by susan rudnicki 8 hours, 12 minutes ago.” Click on the “+4 hidden) and my post on diagnosing and reporting bee poisoning losses will show.

    #10912

    susan rudnicki
    Moderator

    Also, to add to the conversation—I have just discovered a large number of crawlers on the ground in my chicken yard. I traced the bees to a nearby nuc that seems to be devastated by a poisoning event. They were a small cutout on the 22nd, and were doing very well, having repaired the combs and hatching brood. Now, the box is full of bees just sitting around barely moving, or dropping off the box and frames. The ones barely alive are being rabidly attacked by Argentine ants.

    #10913

    Melissa Ozeas
    Participant

    I don’t see anywhere to click on your hidden posts Susan! And I would really like to read what you wrote!

    #10914

    susan rudnicki
    Moderator

    Look at the top of the post —here—

    Poisoned bees?
    Home › Forums › HoneyLove Forum › Poisoned bees?

    This topic contains 7 replies (+ 4 hidden), has 3 voices, and was last updated by Melissa Ozeas 1 hour, 23 minutes ago.

    Viewing 8 posts – 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

    The cursor should show a hand icon over the part in parentheses

    #10915

    susan rudnicki
    Moderator

    Look at the top of the post —here—

    Poisoned bees?
    Home › Forums › HoneyLove Forum › Poisoned bees?

    This topic contains 7 replies (+ 4 hidden), has 3 voices, and was last updated by Melissa Ozeas 1 hour, 23 minutes ago.

    Viewing 8 posts – 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

    The cursor should show a hand icon over the part in parentheses

    #10916

    Melissa Ozeas
    Participant

    What I see is this:

    This topic contains 9 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by susan rudnicki 10 minutes ago.

    And there is nothing that says “hidden”. I just want to make sure we are all seeing the same thing. I have a feeling the rest of us cannot see anything that says “hidden”. Must be a problem with the website.

    #10917

    susan rudnicki
    Moderator

    Yes, you are not seeing the same thing I am. I copied and pasted the relevant lines as they appear to me and you can see they look different. Things are messed up. I will try to copy and paste the “hidden” wording and see if it will go up here.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)

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