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Bait hive

Home Forums HoneyLove Forum Bait hive

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Steve Hanna 6 months ago.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
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  • #8339

    Steve Hanna
    Participant

    I will be placing a bait hive out tomorrow near a known, gentle, feral hive and I have a couple questions. How long do I leave the bait hive out and when I bring them home ( about 10 miles away ), do install them immediately or put the bait hive on top of empty hive for a week? This is my first hive and I have been scouring the web for the answers but can’t seem to find a common ground. Any help would be appreciated

    #8348

    Ruth Askren
    Participant

    Hi Steve, I have read over your post several times and I can’t figure out what you’re trying to do. Is this a bait hive for a trapout? Is your bait hive a nuc or a regular hive body? How many frames? What are you using for bait? Where are you located (city)? Please answer those questions and then I can help you.
    Ruth

    #8349

    Steve Hanna
    Participant

    I am trying to capture a swarm to start a top bar beehive. I designed my bait hive off of the design by Phill Chandler’s flower pot trap but only much larger and made out of wood. It looks like a mini TBH, with 10 top bars which are painted with wax and honey. I also added a little extra honey and bee lure I got from Mann Lake. The bait hive is located in the hills of Glendale, near a feral hive that I know is docile, it’s been there for about 5 years and I am always poking my nose around checking them out, but the TBH I built is on my property in Shadow Hills

    #8355

    Ruth Askren
    Participant

    Oh! I didn’t realize you’re trying to catch a swarm. You don’t say where your swarm box is placed, but it should be 10-15 feet in the air for best advantage to scout bees. It will help you to get the box down when it is filled with bees, if you build a handle on to it. Check out this link:

    http://www.michiganbees.org/2013/catching-spring-swarms/

    The writer is summarizing information from Tom Seely, a Cornell U. professor who studies Swarm Intelligence. It’s also important that the box be about a cubic foot. Here in Southern California with our local bees’ genetics having some Africanization, they don’t seem to care that much about a whole 40 liter sized box which is typically recommended.

    Be careful about putting honey in a swarm box. Scout bees aren’t looking for honey, but robber bees will be looking for it and their presence could discourage the desired occupants. The lure smell, the wax and the space itself; those are the things that will attract a swarm. Good luck!

    #8360

    Steve Hanna
    Participant

    Thank you very much this has helped

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