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Tag Archives | bee hive

HoneyLove Tea Table

We are making a sweet tea table for our office from upcycled top bar hives!! HoneyLove Tea Table

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Happy St. Gobnait’s Day!

St. Gobnait

St. Gobnait – Patron Saint of Bees and Beekeepers
The tall statue pictured above is of St. Gobnait in southwest Ireland (erected in the 1950s).
She appears with a nun’s habit standing on a bee hive surrounded by bees. [Featured art by sleekitbeastie]

 

“Saint Gobnait’s Day is Feb 11th is still celebrated by the community of Ballyvourney, in County Cork. During a Mass at the well, everyone takes water from it.

Gobnait (Gobnet, Gobhnet, Gobnaid, Gobnata, or Gobnatae), was born in County Clare, Ireland, sometime in the 5th or 6th century. Gobnait is Irish for Abigail (“Brings Joy”). As the patron saint of beekeepers, her name also has been anglicized as Deborah, meaning ‘Honey Bee’…

One of the miracles attributed to Saint Gobnait was that she protected a parish by unleashing a swarm of bees… She had a strong relationship with bees and used the properties of honey in the treatment of illness and healing of wounds.”

[via nbba.wordpress.com]

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HoneyLove at the #YouTubeSpace open house

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WATCH / LISTEN / LOVE : “Honeybee” by Scott Mellis (Live in the Backyard)

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beespace

Undergraduate Thesis by Stephanie Newcomb
Project Advisor: Dale Clifford

Beespace is the technical term to describe the space for movement in a Langstroth beehive which is between 3/8” to 1/4”.

“According to Michael Pollan, in his book the Botany of Desire, he places the hypotheses that humans have co-evolved with plants and that maybe instead of humans domesticating the plants for their benefit, it has been the plants that have allured the human for their greatest desire: guarantee their own survival. Through the history of the coevolution between bees and humans there is an understanding of the levels of control, the domestication of the species through its architecture. My intent is to speculate on a cohabitation of humans and bees through a residential architecture. Given the current state of the coevolution, there is a stress not only on the bee population but also on the dependency of the bee. In the last few years the bees have been introduced into urban and suburban environments where it has been proven to be a better places for the bees health.”

[click here to read the full thesis]

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Group Photo from today at the Michael Bush Lecture & Hive Inspection!

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PHOTO: Honeycomb

[via Justus Thane; Flickr]

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PHOTO: This is how BEESWAX is made - 
[via honeybeesuite.com

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ARTICLE: Close Quarters With Honey Bees

By the way, we have about 8,000 honey bees in our living room.

As conversation-starters go, this is one of our better ones. And it’s true – we do have about 8,000 honey bees in our living room – give or take 1,000. Thankfully they are all very safely contained, with a clear path directly to the out-of-doors.

We started keeping bees in spring 2011. Our interest was partially driven by the plight of the honeybees, and partially by our own curiosity. However, we also wanted to help foster our little homesteady ecosystem. Thanks to my husband’s organic green thumb, we have a number of blueberry, currant, and raspberry bushes around the property, as well as apple trees, plum trees, peach trees, grape vines, hazelnut bushes, asparagus, cherry trees, and a big garden as well. Although the honeybees do not pollinate all of these different species, they do hit some of them – and it’s nice to know that we’re also helping out native wildflowers.

Our bees are and always have been raised treatment-free. They are a more persnickety variety, but this breed is apparently more resistant to varroa mites – one of the many things thought to be contributing to colony collapse – and generally hardier. As much as possible, our hope is to help keep an organic, more natural balance on our property.

Back to the bees in our living room. During the winter, my husband decided to build an observation hive to hang in our living room. This is a glass-walled hive that gives a clear view to 3 frames of bees. I was leery of the idea, but it has proven to be an amazing experience. It has frequently been our go-to evening entertainment. The kids have been deeply intrigued, and love to spend time looking for the queen, seeing what has changed, and telling our guests all about our observation hive.

During their time in our living room, we have watched:
the bees make a new queen
the  new queen kill off the 2 dozen or so other potential queens
the colony population triple
Queenie (our pet name for the queen) lay eggs
the drone (male bee) population die out and new ones take their places
new bees eat their way out of their brood cells
bees making honey
bees feeding larvae
and so much more!

The observation hive has been an invaluable tool teaching us how to better care for our bees, and has given our young kids a unique education that they can share with friends and family.

[click here to view the original article on seventhgeneration.com]

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Waldorf-Astoria Hotel Installs Bee Hives On Roof

via huffingtonpost.com
 

NEW YORK — New York City’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is buzzing with thousands of tiny new visitors.

The luxury hotel has installed six beehives on its rooftop with the goal of harvesting honey by mid-summer. One mature hive has 20,000 bees and five starter hives have 5,000 bees each.

By August, the hotel hopes to host 300,000 bees in total.

The bees arrived last week in a luxury car. Then they were escorted through the lobby to their new home on the 20th floor.

Guests at the historic hotel can tour the hives. The insects also are visible from certain rooms.

Honey will be used in dishes served at the hotel’s restaurant.

Members of the public can help the hotel name the hives in a social media contest.
 

[click here to read another article about the Waldorf-Astoria bees here]

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