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susan rudnicki

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 374 total)
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  • in reply to: Source for organic beeswax? #11227
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    Yes, you may want to subscribe to the Treatment Free Facebook group as a good source for TF discussion and learning. I know some on the site have used the skewers for reinforcement. In my own hives, since I began beekeeping 8 years ago, I have always been foundationless, no wires or any other reinforcements, mostly deep boxes (not just brood boxes) and extract my honey successfully without blowing out frames. I uncap each side of frame, turn the crank slowly to start (unweight each side) turn the frames, spin again, and then later spins can be at higher speed. I do not use excluders either.

    in reply to: Source for organic beeswax? #11225
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    By the way, Michael Bush (“The Practical Beekeeper—Beekeeping Naturally) urges that bees do NOT need to have wax applied to the comb guide (starter strip) Pg 550 of his book. I never do and the bees build very well.

    in reply to: Bee hive needs rescue near El Camino College, Torrance, CA #11112
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    CJ Mathiowetz—I believe this may be the colony that the cul de sac neighbor called me about yesterday. “Cindy” at 15915 Atkinson Ave. Is this correct? I am planning to look at it today, but Cindy reports it is 20 feet in the air and I am wondering who is planning to pay for this expensive removal, if it can even be accessed? Please call me at 310-421-6892 if this is the colony I think it is. Susan Rudnicki, beekeeper

    in reply to: Cut Outs #11026
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    In big colony cutouts, I try to make as few cuts as possible to the brood combs and use the right size frame for the combs. So, sometimes the frames are mixed mediums and deeps—no problem as long as you use a deep box. ALSO–one of my mentors showed me a cool way to secure the combs UP AGAINST the underside of the topbar, so you don’t have GAPS there—bees hate to fill in a gap at the top of the comb but readily extend down to the bottombar from a comb edge. The trick is to use small plastic zip ties as “tourniquets” around the rubber bands and stretch the band from the topbar side upward, to increase the pressure and keep the comb in contact with the topbar underside. It is hard to describe, much easier to see from a demo. Don’t know how to do that for you except maybe by phone Skype.

    in reply to: Cut Outs #11025
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    Yes, it is hard to explain—but when you see the colony in situ, you know how the combs are usually hanging in the area with “bee space” between the multiple combs? Each of those combs is ideally placed in the same spaced relationship, or a series of hanging frames in the hive body. That’s what I mean by “stacked” Say a small cutout has only 4 combs, the size of your outstretched hand. You don’t wanna “line up” the combs in one frame or two frames, but make 4 medium frames hold one comb each, all stacked next to each other This is the original arrangement of the combs for thermal regulation—typically the brood toward the middle of the “stack” and the honey/nectar combs toward the “outside” for thermal insulation of the brood. Is that better?

    in reply to: Swarms and Swarm Traps #11024
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    I picked up a swarm today in Trader Joe’s parking lot. Also, a meter box cutout. Swarm season is off and running early due to the warm dry weather this year. Last year it was pouring rain till mid-March. I see a lot of drones and drone brood already in my colonies. Swarm traps are not a sure thing—they can sit for years and never bring in anybody—just as well to just have old hive bodies, previously occupied sitting out anywhere!

    in reply to: Cut Outs #11021
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    Simon—Unless the honey is in old darker, more rigid, comb, it will flow out of the cut combs and drown a lot of bees. I put it in zip-lock bags, smashed a bit, and slits cut into the top side with a razor blade. The bees will re-harvest it at their leisure without getting coated with it. Place the bags within a feeding shim (a med. hive body or a purpose built feeding shim) ON TOP of the top box of frames (where the brood should be) Bees naturally go UP in covering the brood. It is also important not to try to “economize” on the space in the frames by lining up brood combs in the frames, when they were “stacked” within the old occupancy. So, even if the broodcomb does not take up the whole frame, don’t be tempted to “puzzle piece” it in there. Bees need it “stacked” like the baffles on a radiator, for best thermoregulation.

    in reply to: Cut Outs #11019
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    Simon—where are you located? I am the Forum moderator and have been doing cutouts for 7 years, since I was trained in the old BackwardsBeekeepers club. Kirk Anderson headed the club and is still my mentor. The first 2 years, as I learned and apprenticed with others, I did all my work with no vacuum and did not charge. When I did a huge wall cutout that took 2 days, and had no vac, I changed my mind about their usefulness. I now also charge for the work. I use a small bucket-type vac for smaller jobs and a large “blows the bees into a hive body” vac for big jobs. All the brood in the latter are framed up separately in another hive body. The vac box accepting the blown in bees has a plastic screen on top, between the vac motor and the bees and the suction can be modulated via a opening with a sliding door. It is very important not to use too much suction, which will damage the bees and suck up nectar inadvertently—both issues with survival. Once all the brood is framed with rubber band retentions around the frames to hold the combs upright (you want to place them in the box in the SAME order and orientation to vertical as they were in the original cavity) they can be stacked on the other box, and the plastic screen pulled out, allowing the bees below to naturally migrate up onto the brood again. I open the door way in the bottom box after awhile for returning bees to find their kin, and leave the boxes ON THAT SITE, strapped with ratchet straps, for at least two days. This gets everybody into the new hive. Close them up and transport only at NIGHT. You DO NOT seal them up for 48 hours, unless you wanna lose the returning foragers. The point with vacuuming up bees is to get them out of the way of being stepped on, drowning in the spilled honey, flying all over the neighborhood, or getting cut while you are trying to section the combs. Also, do not smoke the bees heavily prior to working—they can so gorge on honey that the vacuuming can cause them to internally rupture and die over a period of days afterward. They are only fierce the first 10 minutes or so. I often remove my gloves after that period so as to handle the combs/rubber bands easier. NO—there is no way to get the bees out of a cavity except by opening it. Poisoning leaves the honey/brood behind to rot and attract vermin, a trap-out also leaves that stuff behind. Lots of people don’t wanna do it right and open the wall, but the fact is, they are left with the structure in the wall if they do not—exterminators do not remove the structure unless they are paid EXTRA, by the way. If you have no experience or equipment, I highly recommend you get with someone who does—this is not for the amateur.

    in reply to: Bee Removal Options #11007
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    Dyna—HoneyLove is a BEEKEEPING organization, not a referral service for the extermination programs of those killing our honey bees—please do not post such businesses on our site. There are other places available for such information. I rescue dozens of colonies from potential extermination every year. The goal of rescuing honey bees is in recognition of the valuable services they provide, the preservation of Nature and the avoidance of more toxics dumped into the environment which impacts humans and other creatures. A good deal of the food on your plate is made possible through the assiduous work of the honey bee.

    in reply to: looking to help and lern im a bigener #10999
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    Hi, EJ—I am the Forum Moderator who answers questions. Since you are a beginner, I would suggest you join our community of beekeepers of all levels of experience to get the support that will benefit your learning. We have monthly meetings with a speaker and bee topic and you have the chance to interact with the other attendees to ask questions and explore techniques. It can take a couple years to become really confident with beekeeping problem solving and hive management, so you want to KEEP READING and learning. You don’t say what book you read, but I would highly recommend the book listed on our “Resources” tab of the website “Saving the Bees…” by Rob and Chelsea McFarland We want to keep bees without chemicals and as naturally as possible. The wild bees you caught will be a VERY good start—they DO NOT need chemical treatments for mites or other pests. Please tell us what city you live in. Also, explore this website for more information on meetings and opportunities to learn. We hope to see you, so introduce yourself when you come out!

    in reply to: Safe removal of bee hives? #10958
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    Chris—I am glad you recognize how unacceptable it is for the city to exterminate bees, but how could you volunteer to remove them if you have no bee skills? I can’t think the city would accept this. There is a LOT to learn to be competent in re-homing established colonies (“hives”) and swarms (clusters of bees with no structures but looking to establish a home)
    I recommend you get in touch with the local bee club, Long Beach Beekeepers, they have a Yahoo group here LBL_Beekeepers@yahoogroups.com
    and their president is Henry Kurland here 562-424-2114 or
    562-366-9368 Some of the members of this group have the skills you lack for these operations. Good luck!

    in reply to: What could be the reason for it? #10950
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    This is a space for the discussion of beekeeping, not computer issues or gaming. Please go to other sites for discussing these things.

    in reply to: Poisoned bees? #10925
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    I am not sure what is useful—the site refuses to post any information of utility. My posts are designated “hidden”

    in reply to: Poisoned bees? #10924
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    I am not sure what is useful—the site refuses to post any information of utility. My posts are designated “hidden”

    in reply to: Poisoned bees? #10920
    susan rudnicki
    Participant

    If you want, send me your email, and I will try to send the copy/paste that way. (or maybe it won’t work, I don’t know…..)

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