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WHEN THE HONEY IS CORPORATE COMMITMENT
(cronista.com article translated from spanish)


The maintenance and care of beehives becomes a new trend to encourage the internal customer and produce a benefit for the community. The keys to a different practice CSR, which helps reduce stress and promotes teamwork.

Despite the sharp drop suffered in recent times, the London Stock Exchange (LSE, for short) does not give up and committed to growth. So much so, in September, thousands of new workers hired. New recruits, however, are not financial, but worker bees. The London Stock Exchange thus becomes the latest company to set up hives in their facilities. Rolet Xavier, CEO of the LSE, is enthusiastic about the project. He himself cultivates bees in the family home in a medieval convent in the region of Provence in southern France. Now he hopes that when the London Stock Exchange receives two hives, which will house 100,000 insects, the project will take care of a fragile and declining population and thus to counteract growing concern in North America and Europe.

In early 2011, the International Bee Research (IBRA, for its acronym in English) believed that beekeepers in the U.S. lost an average of 42% of their colonies last winter. The losses in the three previous winters ranged between 29% and 36%. Generally, in beekeeping is considered a loss of about 15% as acceptable. Concern about the declining number of bees has led to an increase in part-time beekeepers, including a growing number of companies that are making their contribution for the maintenance of new hives.

One famous example is that of Vince Cable, Business Secretary of the British Government, who is enthusiastic about beekeeping and has spearheaded campaigns to raise funds for research on these insects. Now, with his new project The LSE hopes to encourage its employees to participate in the care of bees. The Exchange will provide bee suits for the staff. Moreover, some of the honey obtained is offered by way of corporate gifts.

Nomura, an investment bank from Japan, proves that the beekeeping business is not a mere folly, but a prática English may well be adapted to other cultures and corporate environments. Its British branch has two beehives on the roof of the building overlooking the River Thames. The initiative is part of a financial institution that develops with The Golden Company, a company with social purposes that offers training courses for young people. The company takes care to harvest the honey and then sell it to the bank employees. For the company, the project offers an opportunity to establish their environmental credentials, and “give something back to the city” Says Dominic Cashman, a company executive.

An added benefit is another example of Martin Farrington, director of IT The Future Laboratory, a market research consultant. The company funded a beekeeping course to develop it in the company. “For me it is an extra benefit, such as access to the gym. Now I can not wait to get to work”. David Geer, Managing Director Warren Evans, a retailer of household furniture, bought two hives that were placed in the workshop of the company, northeast of London. “I wanted to motivate employees with something different, that was fun and not just work” says the entrepreneur. “It’s relaxing and it absorbs what is happening around them. You have to move slowly and think carefully in order not to disturb the bees” he concludes.


Click here to read the full article by By Emma Jacobs on 
Cronista.com

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