like Facebook follow Twitter watch YouTube subscribe RSS Feed
Tag Archives | yellow

PLEASE SIGN OUR NEW PETITION : Legalize Urban Beekeeping in Los Angeles!!

Atlanta, New York, Seattle, Portland, Denver, Spokane, Chicago, San Francisco, Toronto, Vancouver and most recently Santa Monica have all taken decisive action and legalized urban beekeeping. Los Angeles currently outlaws beekeeping in residential areas, and the city’s policy is to exterminate all feral honey bees. With worldwide bee populations threatened with Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and urban beekeeping more popular than ever, this policy needs to change. We believe it to be a necessary and just measure requiring immediate action.

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Photo: honey :: bears (by reny :: honey)

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Honey Bee Braids Wig

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

British Beekeeping Association: “Criteria for apiary sites” –

It will rarely be possible to find a perfect location for an apiary, but below are some factors to bear in mind when searching for a suitable spot.

Family, neighbors and the public: Unfortunately many people are afraid of bees. While honey bees are usually not aggressive whilst out foraging, sometimes the public confuses wasps with bees and may come blaming you when they get stung. To try and make your bees less visible, it’s good practice to enclose the apiary with a barrier of some sort, such as a hedge or fence to force the bees to fly in above head height… Keeping your hives less visible also helps reduce the chance of vandalism or theft…


Forage
: Try to find out the amount and type of food sources available within your potential site, by taking a walk about and/or by asking local beekeepers… Bees usually forage within a 2-3 mile radius of their hives. It takes four pounds of nectar evaporated down to produce one pound of honey; it takes about a dozen bees to gather enough nectar to make just one teaspoon of honey, and each of those dozen bees needs to visit more than 2,600 flowers…


Environment
:

A flat site is easier to place hives on!
South facing is warmest.
The site should be sheltered from wind…  
It should be a site which does not flood
Keep hives away from the bottom of dips in the land…
Most books advise that sites under trees are unsuitable…

The bees will need a water source to produce brood food, dilute honey stores and cool the hive in hot weather. If a suitable pond or stream is not available consider providing a shallow water source in a sunny position, with stones bees can rest on to avoid drowning. Place this away from their main flight paths to avoid fouling. Adding a distinctive smell, such as peppermint essence, will help the bees find the water.

Access: Easy access to a site throughout the year, with a hard path down to the apiary, is important. Honey supers are heavy, so if you are using an out apiary it helps if you can park your car nearby. Sites which require climbing fences or ditches to enter are a bad idea…

Space: You need room to stand while inspecting and somewhere to put the roof and supers down….

[click here to read the full post on adventuresinbeeland.wordpress.com]

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

VIDEO: Honey Harvest by Kinfolk

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Our first Etsy item!! ? 

HoneyLove Blown Glass Ornaments

Yellow and black hand blown glass ornaments by HoneyLover Eric Anderson (Seattle, WA). All proceeds from ornament sales donated to non-profit HoneyLove.org

HoneyLove is a Los Angeles based conservation organization with a mission to protect the honeybees and inspire and educate new urban beekeepers.

[click here to our HoneyLove ornament on Etsy]

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Join us Saturday November 19th for our first annual YELLOW TIE EVENT!!
Click link for more details: http://www.theg2gallery.com/calendar/1111.html

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Honeybees, the new urban dwellers

“Honeybees play a vital role in many areas of our lives – they pollinate our crops and medicinal plants – but their population has decreased by 30% since 2008. Could our towns and cities now provide them with a safe haven?


Major cities around the world such as London, New York, Hong Kong and Paris are encouraging bees to set up home in the city. Rooftops, small urban gardens and even balconies are providing potential safe-havens for honeybees, our newest and, in many ways, most-important urban dwellers.

The future of mankind is dependent on the survival of the bee.

Honeybees are responsible for pollinating 80% of our food crops worldwide, therefore risks to their health threaten our own food security. Many medicines, an enormous part of our textile industry and, of course, perfumes and cosmetics also rely on flowers and plants that are pollinated by bees.

In short we have the honeybee to thank for the basic components of our daily lives, from the food we eat and the drugs we need, to the clothes we wear – and that’s without beginning to consider items of luxury.

However, the honeybee population has decreased by 30% since 2008 and the reasons for their poor health are multifaceted. Today the rural environment poses severe health risks to bees through intensive farming methods and the use of pesticides.

“Mono crop” farming means that many bees now have a “mono pollen diet”. This could be detrimental to their health as pollen provides bees with protein; as each pollen variety contains different nutrients that are needed to maintain good health, missing out on certain nutrients leaves bees vulnerable to diseases.

Bees that miss out on a balanced diet can also become more susceptible to parasites, such as the varroa mite, or colony collapse disorder, which is believed to be caused by a combination of fungal and viral infections.

Such threats mean the honeybee could potentially have a better chance of survival in urban environments.

City living potentially provides a rich and varied source of pollen that gives bees all the nutrients and enzymes they require for their good health.

Bees that live in the city may also benefit from new kinds of beehive designs that have been created specifically for urban bees.

This growth in the urban honeybee population, and the need for it to be encouraged, calls for not only new type of homes which are suitable for beekeeping, but also a complete re-examination of our relationship with honeybees where they live beside us and we welcome their presence.”

[click here to read the original article on guardian.co.uk]

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

EPIC NEWS!!!
TRUE BLOOD DONATES TO HELP RAISE MONEY FOR THE HONEYBEES!!
?

Signed items for ebay auction to benefit HONEYLOVE.org (Los Angeles based nonprofit conservation organization with a mission to protect the honeybees and inspire and educate new urban beekeepers).

Charity auction includes: True Blood reel, Rolling Stone, and ties signed by Stephen Moyer (Bill Compton) and Kristin Bauer Van Straten (Pam Swynford De Beaufort).

Click here to view live auction on ebay (open through Nov 26, 2011)

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

JOIN US this SATURDAY as we SWARM LMU!!
FREE film screening and photobooth shenanigans ?
REMEMBER TO WEAR SOME YELLOW AND BLACK!!

Click here to see the event on facebook!

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized