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Tag Archives | pollinate

WE LIKE YOU TOO!!! Thanks so much for your support!!

http://www.facebook.com/honeylove.org

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HONEYLOVE SWARM RESCUE
Marina del Rey, CA – 5/9/12

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Help us to legalize urban beekeeping in Los Angeles!! ?

PLEASE SIGN OUR PETITION:
http://www.change.org/petitions/legalize-urban-beekeeping-in-los-angeles-2

[photo via ecovisionslc]

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HoneyLove + Borage
Random fact of the day… did you know that borage refills with nectar every 2 minutes!!

“According to old wives’ tales, borage was sometimes smuggled into the drink of prospective husbands to give them the courage to propose marriage.” [via Mary Campbell, A Basket of Herbs]

“Bristly or hairy all over the stems and leaves…the flowers are complete, perfect with five narrow, triangular-pointed petals… Traditionally borage was cultivated for culinary and medicinal uses, although today commercial cultivation is mainly as an oilseed… [Borage] has a sweet honey-like taste and as one of the few truly blue-colored edible substances, is often used to decorate dessert.” [via Wikipedia]

Photo credit: HoneyLover John Fedorowicz

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Waldorf-Astoria Hotel Installs Bee Hives On Roof

via huffingtonpost.com
 

NEW YORK — New York City’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is buzzing with thousands of tiny new visitors.

The luxury hotel has installed six beehives on its rooftop with the goal of harvesting honey by mid-summer. One mature hive has 20,000 bees and five starter hives have 5,000 bees each.

By August, the hotel hopes to host 300,000 bees in total.

The bees arrived last week in a luxury car. Then they were escorted through the lobby to their new home on the 20th floor.

Guests at the historic hotel can tour the hives. The insects also are visible from certain rooms.

Honey will be used in dishes served at the hotel’s restaurant.

Members of the public can help the hotel name the hives in a social media contest.
 

[click here to read another article about the Waldorf-Astoria bees here]

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The Implications by Rick Bursky 
Published in “The Gettysburg Review” Summer 2012 
 

“The man at the entrance to the alley was not stung.
The three eyes of a bee see the world their own way.”


[Bees have three simple eyes, and two compound eyes. This allows bees to detect polarized light — something human beings cannot do. –
science.howstuffworks.com]

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Six reasons to become an urban beekeeper


1. Healthy bees make a healthy planet

Bees play a crucial role in the Earth’s ecosystem. They are essential for biodiversity, as they have a symbiotic relationship with flowering plants, and they are an important part of the food chain. They pollinate plants and trees, crops that we rely on as food sources, and the cotton we wear against our skins. It’s even thought that they contribute to reducing exhaust fumes in cities by filtering them out of the atmosphere.
 

2. Bee populations are on the decline

Colony Collapse Disorder has been causing mass bee deaths over recent years and it is a widely-discussed phenomenon today, however most people who are concerned about CCD and bee health feel helpless when it comes to reducing the plight of the bees.

When asked why bees are dying prematurely and in vast numbers, experts point to a combination of the varroa mite and other viruses, however the root of the problem can be attributed to a variety of factors including the way bees are currently ‘farmed’, and the use of pesticides and insecticides used in modern-day agricultural practices, which have inevitably entered the bee food chain..
 

3. Bees need a break from being farmed like cattle

In modern agricultural practices bees are treated like commodities in the same way that factory farm animals are used for maximum output using minimal resources and space. In many countries today bees are fed sugar-water in place of their own nutrient-rich honey and confined to small, compact hives which are stacked on top of one another and designed to allow constant interference from their farmers. These large-scale bee‘keepers’ use bee colonies to pollinate vast quantities of the same crop in one sitting, for example a single almond plantation, then they package them up again to let loose on the next field. Like cattle, their natural feeding habits and freedoms are restricted, and they succumb to health problems as a consequence of these unnatural practices.
 

4. Urban beekeeping is necessary for strengthening bee populations

The primary aim of natural beekeeping is not to harvest the products bees create, such as honey and beeswax, but to help colonies to maintain optimum health by giving them a safe, non-invasive space to ‘bee’.

One of the best ways you can do this is by offering a small space in your garden to the bees. Due to the vastly differing plants available within small spaces in urban areas, bees actually thrive in busy cities and towns. According to Parisian bee artist Olivier Darne, in ‘an analysis of the honey we made here in Paris…it contained more than 250 different pollens. In the countryside there can be as few as 15 or 20 pollens’.
A backyard space in a city provides an ideal habitat for a bee colony. Bees can travel large radiuses to access further nutritious plant nectar, and bees kept in urban areas are alsoless likely to encounter large amounts of pesticides and insecticides which are commonly used to treat crops en masse in countryside fields.
 

5. Backyard beekeeping doesn’t cost you anything

It can cost virtually nothing to provide a rich habitat for a colony of bees, but the value of this colony to our planet is immense. Natural beekeeping does not require the use of the expensive equipment that is used to interfere with bee patterns, such as smoking them out to get to their honey, or donning protective suits to avoid attacks triggered by this honey ‘harvesting’ (stealing). The Top-Bar beehive is designed to minimise how much the bees are disturbed by the keeper, as it allows maximum visibility of bee life without forcing them to evacuate the hive in order to observe them. With a Top-Bar hive you can get to know your bees and even closely study them without ever having to open the hive up completely. You can make your own Top-Bar beehive for free using this guide, thanks to champion bee guardian Phil Chandler.
 

6. Bees have much to teach us

Chandler wrote The Barefoot Beekeeper as a guide to natural beekeeping without a protective suit. He advocates learning the way of the bees by observing them and literally listening to them to work out their natural patterns, for example when they are most busy and should therefore be left alone, and when they might welcome a visit from the keeper.

Left to themselves, bees are harmless creatures, busy running the hive in their various allocated roles, working all day long, and serving and protecting the queen bee. All they need from you is a safe base to come back to at the end of a working day, and in return for this you get to watch the fascinating way in which these insects work together. The bee dance is simply amazing to witness first-hand.

When you ‘keep’ bees in this manner you come to realise that these humble, hardworking insects keep the natural order of things buzzing in a way that humans can only partially understand, but that we can certainly learn to appreciate more. Have you ever used the phrase ‘the bee’s knees’ to describe something of high quality or excellence? Such is the world of the bees. When you become a backyard beekeeper, you open up a complex, beautiful facet of the natural world. And you’ll never want to look back.
 

[click here to read the original post on theecologist.org]

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Beekeeping: cheaper than therapy and you get honey! 

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Lyric Everly “Pure Honey” EP Release Party
—> Check out the live streaming of tonights concert starting at 7pm
($1 from each EP sold @ this event will be donated to HoneyLove ?!!!)

http://s3-media4.ak.yelpcdn.com/ephoto/_yS6JJ6OXAv5R7MDENzp_g/l.jpg

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MEAD!!

The Hochdorf drinking horn has a capacity of 5.5 litres, which was enough to get suitably inebriated. It’s the largest and most precious drinking horn, specially reserved for the host. The iron was forged into the shape of a horn and decorated with shear gold. The tip was adorned with beads made of bones. Kunst der Kelten, Historisches Museum Bern. From The Hochdorf Chieftain’s Grave is a richly-furnished Celtic burial chamber dating from 530 BC. An amateur archaeologist discovered it in 1977 near Hochdorf an der Enz (municipality of Eberdingen) in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Found with a large cauldron decorated with three lions around the brim. The cauldron was originally filled with about 100 gallons (400 l) of mead.

[via Ethnobeeology]

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