like Facebook follow Twitter watch YouTube subscribe RSS Feed
Tag Archives | organic beekeeper

Beekeeping takes flight in primary school

Learning to look after bees has transformed the behavior of unruly pupils, says headteacher

When a swarm of bees descended on Charlton Manor primary school in Greenwich the teachers’ first reaction was concern. Some were afraid they would have to close the school. But what struck headteacher Tim Baker was how calm the pupils were – and how fascinated.

A bee catcher was called in to collect the uninvited swarm. But Baker was sufficiently intrigued by the children’s reaction to arrange for himself and two members of his staff to go on a beekeeping course. A year later, the school got its own hive.

Beekeeping has now been thoroughly integrated into Charlton Manor’s curriculum. In PE, the children study the waggle dance that scout bees do to tell the other bees where nectar is to be found. In cooking lessons, they use honey in their recipes, and in geography, they learn how different parts of the world make use of bees.

Business advisors have helped the children open a shop selling honey in the school playground. The pupils weigh the honey and work out pricing, write ads for the shop and design branding for the jars.

An unexpected benefit has been the effect the bees have had on behavior. Baker says they have had a “massive impact” on challenging pupils:

“One of the big things for me is getting children to think of others, and to be aware of their responsibility to others. With some children, you can’t get them to understand that in relation to other children, but you can show them using bees, chickens or plants.”

One pupil was a regular visitor to the school’s behavioral support house because of his violent outbursts of kicking, punching and throwing furniture around. While he struggled with academic work, he discovered that he excelled at the the practical side of beekeeping: making the wooden frames that go into the hive, and dismantling the hive to access the honey.

When the Guardian’s bees expert, Alison Benjamin, visited the school, the pupil told her: “The bees made me peaceful and calm.”

Jo Sparkes, the school gardener, told Benjamin: “We think it is the scale of the responsibility he has been given that he is responding positively to. He can’t kick off around the hive because we, and the bees, need to trust him.

“It’s not just him, other unruly children have also risen to the challenge. They have finally found something they like to do at school and they are good at.”

Chris Deaves, from the British Beekeepers Association, has helped write a guide for teachers thinking about introducing bees to their schools.

He says: “The first thing teachers always ask is, can we keep bees?. And the answer is, yes. Unless there is a restriction in your tenancy agreement, there is no law against keeping bees.”

The second question tends to be about safety: “Parents and governors worry about the effects of stings. People get over-excited about bee stings: although there are occasional tragedies, these are extremely rare.”

A properly thought-out procedure should take care of such anxieties, he advises. Benjamin’s book on urban beekeeping contains a section on how schools can assess risk.

Deaves stresses the importance of consulting an expert about where to put the hive. Bees follow flight paths, and you want to avoid establishing one across the school playground.

Surprisingly, having a hive on site doesn’t mean that there will be more bees around. Bees forage 2-3 km from their hive – and not within 100m of it.

Baker wholeheartedly recommends beekeeping: “When I first looked into it, I was thinking of the curriculum. But it has had unexpected spin-offs – it has given parents and children a common interest, improved the behavior of disaffected pupils, and worked on the two extra ‘r’s’ in the curriculum: respect and responsibility.”

[click here to read the original article on guardian.co.uk]

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Video from our National Honey Bee Awareness Day Event!!
August 20, 2011 – Los Angeles, California 
HoneyLove.org 

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1btOBmNmZw

Winnie the Pooh (2011) - “Everything is Honey”

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJg-eXI7Pxg

Old school…

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Max Fischer, Rushmore Beekeepers President

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-3WDgKyfWO04/Tl23PPpHCvI/AAAAAAAAUg8/rY5G6TVV79I/s512/Screen%252520shot%2525202011-08-30%252520at%2525208.47.06%252520PM.png

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

WHEN THE HONEY IS CORPORATE COMMITMENT
(cronista.com article translated from spanish)


The maintenance and care of beehives becomes a new trend to encourage the internal customer and produce a benefit for the community. The keys to a different practice CSR, which helps reduce stress and promotes teamwork.

Despite the sharp drop suffered in recent times, the London Stock Exchange (LSE, for short) does not give up and committed to growth. So much so, in September, thousands of new workers hired. New recruits, however, are not financial, but worker bees. The London Stock Exchange thus becomes the latest company to set up hives in their facilities. Rolet Xavier, CEO of the LSE, is enthusiastic about the project. He himself cultivates bees in the family home in a medieval convent in the region of Provence in southern France. Now he hopes that when the London Stock Exchange receives two hives, which will house 100,000 insects, the project will take care of a fragile and declining population and thus to counteract growing concern in North America and Europe.

In early 2011, the International Bee Research (IBRA, for its acronym in English) believed that beekeepers in the U.S. lost an average of 42% of their colonies last winter. The losses in the three previous winters ranged between 29% and 36%. Generally, in beekeeping is considered a loss of about 15% as acceptable. Concern about the declining number of bees has led to an increase in part-time beekeepers, including a growing number of companies that are making their contribution for the maintenance of new hives.

One famous example is that of Vince Cable, Business Secretary of the British Government, who is enthusiastic about beekeeping and has spearheaded campaigns to raise funds for research on these insects. Now, with his new project The LSE hopes to encourage its employees to participate in the care of bees. The Exchange will provide bee suits for the staff. Moreover, some of the honey obtained is offered by way of corporate gifts.

Nomura, an investment bank from Japan, proves that the beekeeping business is not a mere folly, but a prática English may well be adapted to other cultures and corporate environments. Its British branch has two beehives on the roof of the building overlooking the River Thames. The initiative is part of a financial institution that develops with The Golden Company, a company with social purposes that offers training courses for young people. The company takes care to harvest the honey and then sell it to the bank employees. For the company, the project offers an opportunity to establish their environmental credentials, and “give something back to the city” Says Dominic Cashman, a company executive.

An added benefit is another example of Martin Farrington, director of IT The Future Laboratory, a market research consultant. The company funded a beekeeping course to develop it in the company. “For me it is an extra benefit, such as access to the gym. Now I can not wait to get to work”. David Geer, Managing Director Warren Evans, a retailer of household furniture, bought two hives that were placed in the workshop of the company, northeast of London. “I wanted to motivate employees with something different, that was fun and not just work” says the entrepreneur. “It’s relaxing and it absorbs what is happening around them. You have to move slowly and think carefully in order not to disturb the bees” he concludes.


Click here to read the full article by By Emma Jacobs on 
Cronista.com

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Baby Girls Bumble Bee Halloween Costume (3-6 Months)

@ ToysRUs.com

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Just saw a commercial for this new mascara by Cover Girl that uses BEESWAX “instead of heavy synthetics”.  Haven’t tried it yet… but it looks pretty cool <3

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

White House Bees Create Record Honey Crop

“Michelle Obama was criticized when she announced in 2009 that she wanted the White House to be home to a vegetable garden and honey bees. Her idea was to add an area for bees on the South Lawn which would then provide pollination for the garden. Nearly three years later, her home gardening movement has taken off.

In fact, the White House garden produced almost a ton of food in one year. That’s a pretty big fete for a space that started with a $200 start up cost. The White House can now also boast that a record honey crop has been produced in its third year of production. A massive 225 and a half pounds of honey!

The number seemed to startle staff beekeeper, Charlie Brandts, who claims that most hobby hives produce 60 pounds of honey or 5 gallons annually.

He told U.S. News, “It’s just craziness. They did really well this year.” The honey bees have been considered over producers since they began creating honey at the White House. The first year the bees created 134 pounds of honey and in the second year the buzzing creatures created 183 pounds of syrupy goodness.

According to Bee Culture’s Kim Flottum, the Obama’s honey bees are in “honey bee heaven” because they are in the perfect location with lots of water, nectar from the garden and, “no pest pressure”.

The White House uses the honey the bees create to give gifts to friends, family, and other famous folks, as well as a replacement for sugar and in food and drink products like cookies, salad dressing, and beer.

It is possible that with the record number of honey produced at the White House on the South Lawn that others will catch on to bee keeping. After all, Michelle Obama’s plan to create a White House garden did lead others to create gardens of their own for their homes and help kids learn to create them at their schools all across the country.

What do you think? Ever given any thought to keeping bees?”

[click here to read the full article on ecorazzi.com]

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Exploding Flowers: Sunflower

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized