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Honeybees Hard at Work

Honeybees at work producing honey combs in the “hive body” at the La Canada Flintridge home of Max DeBrouwer. Worker honeybees raised during the spring or summer months may live for 6 or 7 weeks. Their lives are especially busy, with lots of hungry larvae to feed, and honeycomb to be produce. (Photo by James Carbone for the Los Angeles Daily News)

By Suzanne Sproul, via Los Angeles Daily News Home & Garden

Have you heard the latest buzz? Los Angeles has laid out the backyard welcome mat for honeybees.

Urban beekeepers couldn’t be happier. After several years of discussion, lawmakers recently joined an increasing number of cities, including Santa Monica, Redondo Beach and Culver City, in attempts to help protect them.

Honeybee fans are thrilled, but some people still worry about safety concerns, particularly for those with bee allergies. The new ordinance requires urban beekeepers to register their hives with Los Angeles County, regulates their distance from property boundaries and nearby streets and calls for them to be kept high above ground and surrounded by a structure, such as a wall or hedge. Typically, only two hives would be allowed at a residence.

“We are very happy that more people and cities are recognizing the importance of honeybees, but everyone should know they’re already here. On average in Los Angeles, there are nine to 11 colonies per square mile. The honeybees live in attics, trees and everywhere, so it’s not that we’re bringing in more. We’re simply trying to protect the ones here,” said Chelsea McFarland, an urban beekeeper along with her husband and the chief executive officer of HoneyLove, a nonprofit in Santa Monica.

Bees….

[read full article via dailynews.com]

Read full story · Posted in HoneyLove Buzz, HoneyLove Interviews, Yay Bees

READ: “Top 5 eco-friendly organizations to support” featuring HONEYLOVE.org

By Sandra Barrera | POSTED: 04/20/15

If you’re looking to become more eco-friendly this Earth Day, think about getting involved with one of these organizations in the L.A. area.

1. Surfrider Foundation: Water quality and encroaching development threatening a favorite surf spot sparked the founding of this grassroots organization by Malibu surfers in 1984. While a certain level of pollution is still tolerated in the ocean that isn’t tolerated on land, Surfrider Foundation is working to change that through advocacy and awareness programs like Ocean Friendly GardensBlue Water Task Force and Rise Above Plastics. The organization dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of the world’s beaches is backed by 85 chapters across the country that have helped rack up more than 300 victories since 2006 ­— it helped to defeat the Hermosa Beach oil drilling measure on March 3.www.surfrider.org.

2. Friends of the Los Angeles River: There’s concrete to remove and riparian habitats to restore before all 50-plus miles of river — from the San Fernando Valley to the ocean in Long Beach — can be returned to its former glory. But it’s on its way thanks to the efforts of this nonprofit organization that has served as the voice of the river since 1986 when it was founded by Lewis MacAdams, who is now its president. For the past 26 years, Friends of the L.A. River has organized “La Gran Limpieza: The Great L.A. River Cleanup”; a “work party” takes place at the Lower River’s Lower Compton Creek and Willow Street Estuary and Golden Shore Marine Reserve in Long Beach from 9 a.m. to noon April 25.www.folar.org

3. California Native Plant Society: Nothing says California like the boisterous riot of saffron-colored poppies in the Antelope Valley or coastal live oaks scattered across rolling canyons. From the Palos Verdes Peninsula to the far reaches of San Bernardino County, the 50-year-old nonprofit organization’s 34 local chapters advocate conserving their region’s unique native plants and natural habitats through education, appreciation and activities such as garden tours, plant sales and field trips. www.cnps.org

4. HoneyLove: This nonprofit conservation organization has changed the way Los Angeles looks at its honeybee colonies by advocating for backyard beekeeping throughout the region, and even shows folks how it’s done through hands-on workshops. Colony collapse disorder, predators and people’s fear of being stung are all threats. HoneyLove works to educate people by promoting bee-friendly gardens managed without the use of pesticides. http://honeylove.org

5. TreePeople: Supporting a sustainable Los Angeles by growing a green, climate-resilient urban forest has been the mission of this environmental nonprofit organization since it was founded by its president Andy Lipkis 43 years ago. Trees cool our climate, clean the air and slow and absorb runoff, as well as prevent soil erosion. Supporting people to plant and care for trees can only do so much, so TreePeople also works with all levels of government to create laws, policies and incentives with the goal of sustainability. www.treepeople.org

[Read original article via dailynews.com]

Read full story · Posted in HoneyLove Buzz, Yay Bees