like Facebook follow Twitter watch YouTube subscribe RSS Feed
Tag Archives | honey love
Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

“Pam” from True Blood just signed our petition to legalize urban beekeeping!! Now it is your turn <3

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized
Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized
Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Fresh Figs with Blue Cheese and Honey 

A dozen fresh figs (if no figs are available, try peaches instead)
1 oz blue cheese, room temperature
Honey!!
Candied walnuts (optional)

Slice the figs in half from the top down and arrange on the plate. Crumble the blue cheese over the figs. Drizzle the honey over the figs and cheese and serve with candied walnuts (optional).

Click here to read the recipe from “Grampa’s Gourmet Honey”

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

 

HONEY BAKLAVA BATONS

These simple cookies, an interpretation of the Middle Eastern pastry of baked phyllo layered with ground nuts and soaked with honey syrup, go nicely with ice cream.

INGREDIENTS:
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
1/4 cup honey
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
4 phyllo sheets (18 inches by 13 inches each)
2/3 cup pistachios, walnuts or a combination of the two, finely chopped (about 8 tablespoons total)

DIRECTIONS: 
Melt the butter with the honey in a small saucepan over medium heat, then remove from the heat and stir in the cinnamon and allspice. Reserve 2 tablespoons for brushing the formed batons. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone liner. Lay one sheet of phyllo (cover the remaining stack with dampened paper toweling to keep the sheets from drying out) on the counter, with one of its long edges running parallel with the edge of the counter. Use a pastry brush to paint the sheet with the butter mixture. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of nuts evenly over the sheet. Carefully grip the edge closest to you and fold it one-fourth of the way, away from you. Fold the folded quarter in half and then in half again. This will create a kind of pastry baton that you can then easily roll all the way to the end of the sheet, until you have created 1 long baton. Cut the baton into five 5 1/2-inch lengths. Transfer the batons to the lined baking sheet, with the seams on the bottom. Repeat the process with the three remaining phyllo sheets. Before baking, brush the tops of the batons with the reserved butter mixture. Bake for 15 to 17 minutes until golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack to cool before serving.

Makes 20 batons

Click here to read the recipe on WashingtonPost.com

Read full story · Posted in Recipes

Harry’s Honey: Nature’s Sweet Treat

“Harry Stein, founder of Harry’s Honey, has been offering different varieties of honey since the Mar Vista Farmers’ Market began in 2006. He joined up in the second week to sell a startling array of choices including clover, sage, orange, lemon, buckwheat and eucalyptus. He even has unusual honeys gathered from avocado, cactus, strawberries and blackberries… While talking with Harry at his booth, it was clear that customers consider him to be as much of a Farmers’ Market staple as his honey!”

Click here to read the full article by Christy Wilhelmi on Mar Vista Patch

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

love it =)

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

i <3 bees

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Greek cities often used animals as identifying symbols on their coins…

The bee was associated with Ephesus for many reasons. According to the writer Philostratos, Imagines 2.8, the Athenians who came to colonize Ionia, where Ephesus is located, were led by the Muses, who took the shape of bees. Artemis’ priestesses were called melissai or “bees” of the goddess (Inschriften von Ephesus 2109), and were directed by “king bees” (essenes), priests who served a year-long term under strict rules of purity (Pausanias 8.13.1); the ancient Greeks and Romans didn’t realize that the leader of a beehive is a queen, not a king.

When the Ephesian Artemis appears in her stiff Anatolian format, bees are often shown on her belt or tight skirt. Indeed, D.G. Hogarth, who excavated the earliest levels of the sanctuary found gold ornaments, some in the shape of bees, that could have been attached to an image’s garments. Some scholars trace the Ephesian Artemis back to an earlier Anatolian goddess whom the Hittites called Hannahanna, who sent a bee to wake up the god Telepinu from sleep/death. On Ephesus’ early silver coins, the bee appears alone on the obverse, with only an incuse stamp on the reverse. 

Read the full article here 

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized