like Facebook follow Twitter watch YouTube subscribe RSS Feed
Tag Archives | honey love

KENYAMen and women work together in beekeeping

“In the drought-stricken areas of Kenya’s northeast, beekeeping helps make life a bit sweeter, especially for women. A World Bank and government funded program helps beekeepers learn how to process and sell their products. Men and women work alongside each other and some women have their own hives now. It’s time to think EQUAL for women and girls.” thinkEQUAL

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

BACKYARD NATURALIST
By Carol Coogan

“The words “bee,” “wasp” and “hornet” are often used interchangeably as people flee, swat or kill anything remotely resembling something they fear may sting them. Having recently witnessed an innocent honey bee meet just such an end while minding its own business collecting nectar from flowers, I offer some clarification.

Although bees, wasps, sawflies and ants all belong the Hymenoptera order of insects, meaning “membrane-winged,” honeybees and bumblebees belong to one family within this order, while wasps belong to several other different families. Hornets and yellow jackets are actually wasps, for example. Wasps are generally aggressive, territorial and predatory. Many feed on other insects and spiders, stinging their prey repeatedly to paralyze them beforehand.

Bees, on the other hand, live a more peaceful existence. Rounder-bodied and more “teddy bear” fuzzy than wasps, bees keep to themselves, moving from flower to flower for their simple diet of honey [and pollen]. No insect is as widely effective for pollinating the crops and flowers we all enjoy as the honeybee. They are not inclined to sting unless threatened, [and] die if they do. Their populations are in decline. Please, be kind to bees.”

[Click here to read the original article on timesunion.com]

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Swarm Rescue: Albert’s Mar Vista Bees

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

HoneyLove was interviewed today by Jenna for Annenberg Television News

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

LA STREET ARTIST BUMBLEBEE

“Bumblebee just completed this great new 30? long mural in an alley off of La Cienega Blvd. in LA. We so love his work. Bee on the look out for big things from him in early 2012”

Keep up with him here: www.flickr.com/photos/theuglyyou

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

According to all known laws of aviation, there is no way that a bee should be able to fly. It’s wings are too small to get its fat little body off the ground. The bee, of course, flies anyway. Because bees don’t care what humans think is impossible.”

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Have you signed our petition yet?
HELP US TO LEGALIZE URBAN BEEKEEPING IN LOS ANGELES!!
http://www.change.org/petitions/help-legalize-beekeeping-in-mar-vista

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

BACKYARD BUZZ URBAN BEEKEEPING

“Urban farming is becoming more and more a part of food culture in Vancouver, and beehives are popping up alongside backyard and community plots. What with the important role bees play in gardening – that would be pollination, for the uninitiated – this makes perfect sense. Of course, beekeeping isn’t exactly as accessible to a first timer as planting a row of peas.

Enter Melissa Cartwright and Backyard Buzz. Working with her elementary-school classmates and the Inner City Farms project that has them transforming backyards around Vancouver into small-scale organic farms, Melissa installed beehives in a couple of the yards.”

[click here to read the full article on vancouverisawesome.com]

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT HONEYLOVERS!! YAY BEES!!!
facebook | twitter | google+ | meetup | youtube | flickr | zazzle

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized

Early beekeepers assumed that queen bees were male, and called them kings, until it was discovered that the “king” was the one laying all the eggs.

Below is an excerpt from: ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ENTOMOLOGY“ by John L. Capinera 

“It was not until 1609 that Charles Butler (an English beekeeper) in his famous book titled ‘The Feminine Monarchie,’ challenged the idea of king bees. Thereafter, in 1670, a Dutch scientist (Jan Swammerdam) proved this hypothesis through dissection, accompanied by his full anatomical drawings of queen, drone and worker…

The year 1609 A.D. (i.e., the date of publication of ‘The Feminine Monarchie’) is considered by some to mark the beginning of our knowledge about the sexuality of the ruler of the hive (the Queen). However, the first person to understand the sex of the queen probably was Luis Mendez de Torres in Spain who published a book in 1586 titled ‘Tractado breve de la cultivation y cur de las colmenas.’ In this book, he stated clearly that the leader bee in the hive laid the eggs, from which all workers, drones and future queens developed.

http://www.theoria.ca/theoria/files/Rusden-FullDiscoveryOfBees1685-2.jpg

In addition to de Torres, the knowledge of several Persian scientists about the queen bee may be traced back to a much earlier period. Ikhawan-ul-Safa (or The Brethren of Purity), who flourished in A.D. 950-1000 at Basra, composed a series of tracts in Arabic language known as the ‘Epistles of the Brethren of Purity,’ (also reported as ‘Epistles of the Brethren of Sincerity’) in the latter half of the tenth century (A.D. 950-1000). The authors of these series were six encyclopaedists, with at least three of them from Persia. Among their work, the ‘Dispute Between Man and the Animals’ is of zoological interest.

The following citation from their work refers to the sexuality of the ruler of the hive:

‘There, the king of the hasharat [insects], Ja’ sub [i.e., the bee queen], rules over the wasps, the flies, the bugs, the mosquitoes, the dung beetles, the spanish flies, the butterflies and moths and over the locusts, i.e., over all small animals which fly by wings, have no feathers, no bones, no soft hair and no fur.’ 

The above statement, which uses the Arabic word of Ja’sub [the bee queen], clearly refers to the sexuality of the hive ruler. It is also the first attempt to define an insect.

After about three centuries, al-Qazwini (the author of ‘Aja ib al-Makhluqat,’ composed in A.D. 1263) clearly speaks of the role of the king of honey bees (the queen) in the production of a new king. Despite the report, the sexuality of the queen as well as the definition of the insect were overlooked by other scholars for a long time.

While the sexuality of the ‘King’ remained unnamed until publication of ‘The Feminine Monarchie’ by Charles Butler in 1609 A.D. (or the publication of the book of Luis Mendex de Torres in 1586 A.D.), the definition of the insect was ignored until the seventeenth century. Although the word ‘King’ used in the former sentences may indicate the ignorance of al-Qazwini about the sexuality of the ‘Queen,’ the second phrase (i.e., “since it is the king who produces again a new king”), leaves no doubt on the awareness of this author about the sex of the ‘Queen.’”

Read full story · Posted in Uncategorized