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Tag Archives | homestead

Ravelry: Queen Bee knitting pattern ? 

Thank you @Beeclef for sending!!

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DIY: Lavender Honey Soda by Gardenista

First, harvest from five to six lavender flowers, leaving a few inches of stem with leaves on each.

Next, make a simple syrup. Bring two cups of water to a boil, and add 1/2+ cup of honey. 

Add your lavender flowers to the syrup and turn off the heat. Let them steep for from 10 to 20 minutes, depending on how floral you prefer your soda.

Pour one or two inches of simple syrup into a glass, add ice, club soda, and a generous squeeze of lemon.

Then sit back and enjoy your garden.

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Hello Kitty Bee (Crochet Pattern) via etsy

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VIDEO: Urban Beekeeping: NYC
“Every new beekeeper is an asset to the community…it’s always a good thing”

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Williams-Sonoma got hip to the beekeeping homestead vibe

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See you TOMORROW at the BEEKEEPER’S RALLY in Mar Vista!!
? Group photo at 10:30am – Remember to wear your bee-suits!!

Address: Venice and Grand View, Mar Vista CA 90066
Additional event details on: Meetup / Facebook

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ARTICLE: Honeybees as plant ‘bodyguards’ -

“Honeybees are important to plants for reasons that go beyond pollination, according to a new study published in the December 23rd issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The insects’ buzz also defends plants against the caterpillars that would otherwise munch on them undisturbed.

The researchers, led by Jürgen Tautz of Biozentrum Universität Würzburg, Germany, earlier found that many caterpillars possess fine sensory hairs on the front portions of their bodies that enable them to detect air vibrations, such as the sound of an approaching predatory wasp or honeybee.

“These sensory hairs are not fine-tuned,” Tautz said. “Therefore, caterpillars cannot distinguish between hunting wasps and harmless bees.” If an “unidentified flying object” approaches, generating air vibrations in the proper range, caterpillars stop moving or drop from the plant…

“Our findings indicate for the first time that visiting honeybees provide plants with a totally unexpected advantage,” the researchers said. “They not only transport pollen from flower to flower, but in addition also reduce plant destruction by herbivores.”

…If crops are combined with attractive flowers in such a way that honeybees from nearby beehives constantly buzz around them, it may lead to significantly higher yields in areas with lots of leaf-eating pests—a notion Tautz’s team intends to test. “Our finding may be the start of a totally new biological control method,” he said.”

[click here to read the full post on physorg.com]

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