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Tag Archives | bee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAYzI91s0WQ

WHO: Dr. Mark Winston
WHAT: Bee Talker – The Secret World of Bees

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“One of the great metaphors for creative community is the hive where many interact for the benefit of the collective.  When the hive is successful it produces an abundance of honey. It is possibly the clearest symbiotic relationship that humans have with the insect kingdom. We don’t need to be reminded of the pollination of plant life that is attributed to bees. Bees make a great deal more honey than they can use. Who do they make it for? The rest of us. For the benefit of all sentient bee-ings. Bees appear in ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, and have been revered as sacred throughout the world.” – Alex & Allyson Grey

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Photo by teetooblog.blogspot.com

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WHO: Laguna Bees
WHAT: NEW BEEKEEPERS! 
WHERE: Laguna Beach

from lagunabees blog:

Day 1- Beekeepers Extraordinaire (well at least we like to think so)

Rob and Chelsea went last night and rescued our new swarm from a pine tree over looking the water in Pacific Palisades. Rob captured them in a one foot square cardboard box and had duct taped the flaps so that the bees were locked in for the night. 

Rob and I nailed and glued the 2 hive boxes and 20 frames and then we put on our beekeeper suits. The photo below is of us – just before Rob cut open the cardboard and got the bees settled into their new hive. It’s on the deck facing north so they can “enjoy” the afternoon sun and cool sea breezes. 

The colorful gardens below have a huge variety of native plants and trees including sage, lavender, mint, goldenrod, daisies, bougainvillea, pine, yucca, olive and many more. 

Leslie and I hope our transplanted bees like their new home… can’t imagine its TOO hard to adapt from their ocean view in Pacific Palisades to their brand new home overlooking the ocean in Laguna Beach. Rob says we have a 50% chance they’ll stay. He said it usually takes about three weeks to know…. personally I think they already know that they have found “the good life”.

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-5JzZyTtH6oo/TezhYgYOf8I/AAAAAAAATCg/qn2sdMz6Cf4/tumblr_lmc5ozolOW1ql40bmo1_500.jpeg

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http://www.citizenglobal.com/viewPlayer?loc=c&hash=7ef00ac72761c9bf59126723ec687c42&projid=157&playOnStart=0

gardendog Honeylove Swarm Capture

“When a swarm of honeybees showed up at my work, my colleagues were eager to get in on the action. Everyone pitched in – from keeping track of the roving swarm and talking to the neighbors, to helping me get to the bees and bravely documenting the capture. 

All the bees made their way into the box, and luckily just a day before I’d built a top-bar hive for a friend who Chelsea persuaded to let us keep bees in his backyard. Later that evening Chelsea and I showed up to his house with a buzzing box, and after some assurances (*and a tiny amount of peer pressure) we installed the bees successfully.

We checked up on them a little over a week later and they were already building lots of comb and looking happy. We’ll see in a couple of week if they choose to stick around in my DIY top bar hive. Check back to see how the CG bees take to their new home.”

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http://www.citizenglobal.com/viewPlayer?loc=c&hash=347caefb0fc5bd617b6fb02866f10d76&projid=157&playOnStart=0

gardendog: Honeylove Swarm Capture

“Chelsea and I drove out to Glendale a couple of weeks ago to respond to a couple calls on the Backwards Beekeepers rescue hotline and were able to capture two beautiful swarms. And just in time too. The exterminator showed up just as I was boxing up the second swarm from the hedge in front of a triplex. He wasn’t thrilled about missing the opportunity to bill his client, but was happy that the bees would be given a new home. Apparently this wasn’t the first time the Backwards Beekeepers beat him to a swarm.”

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Bees need water too!
via mistressbeek.com

“For urban beeks, providing a clean water source for your bees is the best way to ensure they don’t take a fatal dip in your neighbor’s pool or flash mob the dog bowl. W
e’ve found a pet waterer filled with rocks at the base is the easiest way to water bees. Looks a little weird, but who said beekeeping was glamorous?”

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photo by gardendog.tumblr.com

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Vegan Beekeeping
by blog.lagusta.com

The vegan ethic is complex and nuanced.  Any vegan that says otherwise is itching for a (respectful, intelligent, I hope) fight.  So I may as well be calling this piece, ‘It’s actually impossible to be vegan, but we are all doing our best.’  To me, veganism is about trying to live in harmony with the planet.  My beekeeping is not an exception to my veganism.  It is a well-thought out amendment. It might even make me a better vegan, depending on how much of this you follow along with.

Still, I am a beekeeper and I am a vegan and that is a sticking point for about 50% of the vegans I know.  This is my attempt to explain my position.  I am vegan because I deeply care about animal rights.  I dig the other benefits, but in my heart, I believe eating animals is wrong. My purpose for saying so is that it needs to be clear from the start that I really care about bees. I am not arguing that I think killing bees or treating them with anything but the utmost respect is OK.  I don’t keep bees because they fall outside of my deeply felt consideration.  In fact, I think bees are amazing… 

Whenever I think about the shortcomings of the human species, I always end up being reminded of the near perfection of bees.  Selfless, female-dominated, self-reliant, dancing, mysterious bees.

Human life as we know it is dependent on bees. It is true that there are wild bee populations; but they are dying. It is a widely held belief within the beekeeping community, and those educated about what commercial beekeeping has done to the world’s bee population, that small-scale “backyard beekeepers” hold the key to preserving disease resistant stock that can survive to pollinate all the foods upon which vegans and non-vegans rely. About 1/3 of the human diet can be traced back to bee pollinated foods…

The point is vegans need plants, and plants need bees.  And bees make honey.

Click here to read the full blog post

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