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Tag Archives | bee keeping

ARTICLE: Urban beekeeping taking root in Santa Monica
Law allows residents to pick up the planet-friendly hobby

“The goal: to get the rather large number of bees currently suspended between 15 and 20 feet above the ground into boxes lined with thin wooden frames in such a way that they would actually create a new hive and stay there…

The discovery of wild honeybees nested in Hekimian’s yard brought back old memories and a keen desire to pick up where his dad had left off, something that couldn’t have happened within Santa Monica’s city limits until early 2011 when the City Council made it legal to have bee hives on private property.

It was a no-brainer, said Dean Kubani, director of the Office for Sustainability and the Environment…

Hekimian contacted Animal Control as soon as he found the hive, received approval and called Rob McFarland.

The two had met just the day before Lucas’ discovery at a beekeeping talk hosted at the Whole Foods Market in El Segundo, one of a series of events the grocery store put on to raise awareness about honeybees and the role they play in the environment.

McFarland and his wife Chelsea were speaking for, a non-profit organization they founded to protect honeybees and help out the uninitiated with bee problems.

McFarland got started in beekeeping a year ago in true DIY fashion… and now McFarland pitches in where he can to help others learn the ins and outs of beekeeping.

He came over Saturday morning, and Project: Bee Relocation got underway…

McFarland began pumping smoke into the hive. He then cut sections of the hive away from the rubber tree plant and handed them to Hekimian as videographer Eric Longden documented the whole affair…

After the main chunks of the hive came down, McFarland and Hekimian trimmed sections of the wax so they would fit within the thin wooden frames and strapped them in with rubber bands.

Eventually, the bees will seal the existing chunks of hive into the frame and chew away the offending rubber bands, McFarland said.

After the frames have been put into the box, it’s a waiting game. The bees could choose to stay in the box, or they could vacate the area and establish a new hive elsewhere.

Within minutes, it was clear the bees would stay. The little creatures crawled through a slit in the box, turned around and began fanning the air with their wings to spread the pheromone signaling wayward bees to come home.

Hobbyist beekeeping is in the middle of a renaissance…

From an environmental point of view, the more bees, the better. Bees are responsible for pollinating a full third of the food that enters our diets, according to Eric C. Mussen, a professor at UC Davis, in a paper titled ‘Don’t Underestimate the Value of Honey Bees!’”

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“honeybee reading about city life” drawing for HoneyLove by marc johns

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WATCH: My Smoker Is My Best Friend – HoneyLove

HoneyLove demonstrates how to use a smoker, and explains why we use smoke when working our bees. 

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WATCH: Honey Bee Rescue – Next Day
featuring (Santa Monica, CA)

“The bees like their new location. I think we will have a strong and productive hive. Thanks goes out to for making it so easy and for my friend Lisa Zolner of Whole Foods Market that made this all happen so quickly with her efforts of bee awareness.” -Paul []

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WATCH: Bold beekeepers buck city bylaw

While not allowed in the city, beekeeping is flourishing in Edmonton. The CBC’s Kim Trynacity looks at how the hobby thrives through secret hives and honey bribes.


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Click here to view HoneyLove’s July Newsletter!

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ARTICLE: How Honey Bees Keep Their Hives Warm Given That They are Cold Blooded

“Today I found out how Honey bees keep their hives warm even though they are cold blooded.

Up until only a few years ago, it was thought by many scientists that the Honey bee hives were kept warm by pupae in the brood and that the bees would often congregate there to warm themselves up from the pupae.  Recently, this was found not to be the case when a new Honey bee job was discovered, that of “heater bees”.  Bees of almost all ages can perform this function by either vibrating their abdomens or they can also decouple their wings from their muscles, allowing them to vigorously use these muscles without actually moving their wings. This can heat their bodies up to about 111° Fahrenheit (44° C), which is about 16° F (9° C) hotter than their normal body temperature.

Another new discovery that went with this was why queen bees leave certain cells in the brood empty.  It was previously thought this was an undesirable quality of a queen, so queens that left less empty cells were sought out.  In fact, these empty cells are essential to a healthy hive.  Before the discovery of heater bees using infrared technology, it was thought the bees that crawled in these empty cells were cleaning them out.  What’s actually happening is that the heater bees will crawl inside these cells to keep the surrounding cells at the proper temperature, able to warm a maximum of about 70 or so cells per heater bee.

The heater bees can also directly regulating temperature in individual cells by standing over and pressing their thorax against an individual cell, something which scientists used to think was just the bees resting.  In reality, they are working their wing muscles extremely hard to heat up the cell with their heightened body temperature…”

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VIDEO: Bee Aware – Share the BUZZ
HoneyLove.orgWhole Foods Market

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TONIGHT: West Los Angeles Neighborhood Council voted in

LA Neighborhood Councils that officially support our urban beekeeping motion so far: 
1. Mar Vista (11/8/11) 
2. Del Rey (12/8/11) 
3. Greater Griffith Park (1/17/12) 
4. South Robertson (1/19/12) 
5. Silver Lake (3/7/12) 
6. Hollywood United (3/19/12) 
7. Atwater Village (4/12/12) 
8. West Los Angeles (6/27/12)


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HoneyLove Outreach @ Whole Foods Market Venice - 6/24/12

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