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Tag Archives | bee keeper

beespace

Undergraduate Thesis by Stephanie Newcomb
Project Advisor: Dale Clifford

Beespace is the technical term to describe the space for movement in a Langstroth beehive which is between 3/8” to 1/4”.

“According to Michael Pollan, in his book the Botany of Desire, he places the hypotheses that humans have co-evolved with plants and that maybe instead of humans domesticating the plants for their benefit, it has been the plants that have allured the human for their greatest desire: guarantee their own survival. Through the history of the coevolution between bees and humans there is an understanding of the levels of control, the domestication of the species through its architecture. My intent is to speculate on a cohabitation of humans and bees through a residential architecture. Given the current state of the coevolution, there is a stress not only on the bee population but also on the dependency of the bee. In the last few years the bees have been introduced into urban and suburban environments where it has been proven to be a better places for the bees health.”

[click here to read the full thesis]

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ORIGINAL PAPER: Honeybees can discriminate between Monet and Picasso paintings

by Wen Wu, Antonio M. Moreno, Jason M. Tangen and Judith Reinhard
via JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY


Abstract

Honeybees (Apis mellifera) have remarkable visual learning and discrimination abilities that extend beyond learning simple colours, shapes or patterns. They can discriminate landscape scenes, types of flowers, and even human faces. This suggests that in spite of their small brain, honeybees have a highly developed capacity for processing complex visual information, comparable in many respects to vertebrates. Here, we investigated whether this capacity extends to complex images that humans distinguish on the basis of artistic style: Impressionist paintings by Monet and Cubist paintings by Picasso. We show that honeybees learned to simultaneously discriminate between five different Monet and Picasso paintings, and that they do not rely on luminance, colour, or spatial frequency information for discrimination. When presented with novel paintings of the same style, the bees even demonstrated some ability to generalize. This suggests that honeybees are able to discriminate Monet paintings from Picasso ones by extracting and learning the characteristic visual information inherent in each painting style. Our study further suggests that discrimination of artistic styles is not a higher cognitive function that is unique to humans, but simply due to the capacity of animals—from insects to humans—to extract and categorize the visual characteristics of complex images.

[click here to view the original paper via springerlink.com]

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Team HoneyLoveThe World Dodgeball Society’s Halloween Spooctacular Costumed Tourney!! 

Yay Bees ?!!!

*If you want to play on Team HoneyLove in our next tournament —> email us!!

[click here to view the full photo album]

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Installing a Swarm Box [via Gardenerd.com]

“As you may know, bees are responsible for pollinating 1 out of every 4 bites of food we eat, so attracting bees to your garden is a really good idea. One way to do it is to put up a swarm box.

Swarm boxes give bees an attractive place to call home. When their hive grows too large, the queen will take some of the bees and leave in search of new digs. If they choose to inhabit your swarm box, they can then be transferred to a proper hive and voila! you’ve got bees.

Inside the swarm box was a place to hang a few starter frames. We were instructed to place a couple cotton swabs with lemongrass oil on top of the frames at the rear of the box. After drawing a line of bees wax across the upper rung of each frame, we placed the bait and closed up the box…

We placed a water dish nearby, because bees need a water source (who knew?). Now we wait and watch for curious creatures to investigate our new bee hotel.”

[Click here to view the full post on Gardenerd.com]

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WATCH: “HoneyLove” 
Directed by Melanie Lim and Ryan Bautista 

Awarded FIRST PLACE at the Public Interest Pictures Non-Profit Film Festival:
http://publicinterestpics.org/film-festival/

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ARTICLE: Thousands Flock to Mar Vista Community Fall Festival

In addition to small business owners, there were a variety of non-profits on hand, including HoneyLove

“We educate and inspire new, urban beekeepers,” explained HoneyLove director Ashley Fontenot. 

She and HoneyLove founder Chelsea McFarland gave away California poppy seeds and did temporary tattoos of honeybees to also try to connect with young children who stopped by the booth with their parents. 

“This year, we got our 501c3 status, and we’re out here gaining more local support,” McFarland said. “We’re expanding in terms of our outreach.”

[click here to read the full article via venice.patch.com]

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Tonight HoneyLove.org was awarded 1ST PLACE at the Public Interest Pictures 48hr Non-Profit Film Festival ?!!! YAY BEES!!! 

Filmmakers: Melanie Lim & Ryan Bautista 

Stay tuned… we will post the film on our YouTube Channel soon!!

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WATCH: The importance of bees
[via tve.org]

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“On the way up to the village today we passed hillsides full of tea plants and chrysanthemums with bee hives at the bottom of the hills about every quarter mile…the boxes look just like ours….thought you’d like to see them!” 

[via HoneyLovers Larry & Leslie Austin traveling through China]

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HoneyLove School Outreach @ Rancho Vista Elementary School ? 72 kids!! 

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