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Tag Archives | backyard beekeeping
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Fresh Figs with Blue Cheese and Honey 

A dozen fresh figs (if no figs are available, try peaches instead)
1 oz blue cheese, room temperature
Honey!!
Candied walnuts (optional)

Slice the figs in half from the top down and arrange on the plate. Crumble the blue cheese over the figs. Drizzle the honey over the figs and cheese and serve with candied walnuts (optional).

Click here to read the recipe from “Grampa’s Gourmet Honey”

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HONEY BAKLAVA BATONS

These simple cookies, an interpretation of the Middle Eastern pastry of baked phyllo layered with ground nuts and soaked with honey syrup, go nicely with ice cream.

INGREDIENTS:
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
1/4 cup honey
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
4 phyllo sheets (18 inches by 13 inches each)
2/3 cup pistachios, walnuts or a combination of the two, finely chopped (about 8 tablespoons total)

DIRECTIONS: 
Melt the butter with the honey in a small saucepan over medium heat, then remove from the heat and stir in the cinnamon and allspice. Reserve 2 tablespoons for brushing the formed batons. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone liner. Lay one sheet of phyllo (cover the remaining stack with dampened paper toweling to keep the sheets from drying out) on the counter, with one of its long edges running parallel with the edge of the counter. Use a pastry brush to paint the sheet with the butter mixture. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of nuts evenly over the sheet. Carefully grip the edge closest to you and fold it one-fourth of the way, away from you. Fold the folded quarter in half and then in half again. This will create a kind of pastry baton that you can then easily roll all the way to the end of the sheet, until you have created 1 long baton. Cut the baton into five 5 1/2-inch lengths. Transfer the batons to the lined baking sheet, with the seams on the bottom. Repeat the process with the three remaining phyllo sheets. Before baking, brush the tops of the batons with the reserved butter mixture. Bake for 15 to 17 minutes until golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack to cool before serving.

Makes 20 batons

Click here to read the recipe on WashingtonPost.com

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Harry’s Honey: Nature’s Sweet Treat

“Harry Stein, founder of Harry’s Honey, has been offering different varieties of honey since the Mar Vista Farmers’ Market began in 2006. He joined up in the second week to sell a startling array of choices including clover, sage, orange, lemon, buckwheat and eucalyptus. He even has unusual honeys gathered from avocado, cactus, strawberries and blackberries… While talking with Harry at his booth, it was clear that customers consider him to be as much of a Farmers’ Market staple as his honey!”

Click here to read the full article by Christy Wilhelmi on Mar Vista Patch

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love it =)

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i <3 bees

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Water Meter Bees

Today Chelsea and I rescued a hive from a water meter in Chase Park in Marina Del Rey with fellow Backward Beekeeper Susan. Susan is a violinist in the Marina Del Rey Orchestra and noticed the bees coming out of the meter after a rehearsal. She contacted the park administration and asked them if we could rescue the bees. They didn’t know about Susan’s bees, but they had planned to call vector control to have another 3 hives in the park exterminated (“foamed”). They were happy to let us rescue the bees.

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I thought it was going to be a fairly small hive because these water meters are checked every few months. Well, this one must have gone awhile because when I cracked the lid, I discovered at least a 6 month old hive. 

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We worked quickly to cut out the comb from the water meter, brush the bees into a nuc box and tie the comb into frames. 

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This was Susan’s first cut-out and she did a great job. Ken, our park supervisor, was intrigued with the whole process, paying careful attention to our every move. He even got his first ever bee sting and could have cared less. 

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None of us could believe how many bees came out of this little water meter. After we brushed the queen into one of the nucs, it was like a stampede to get in. The entrance hole soon clogged, forcing the bees to pack another four nucs to the gills. In the end, we rescued every single bee, saving these prolific little creatures from the foam. 

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Just made up a new case of RAW ORGANIC LOCAL HONEY from our honeybee rescues 
to give to our HoneyLove sponsors!

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“Bees figure prominently in mythology and have been used by political theorists as a model for human society. Journalist Bee Wilson states that the image of a community of honey bees “occurs from ancient to modern times, in Aristotle and Plato; in Virgil and Seneca; in Erasmus and ShakespeareTolstoy, as well as by social theorists Bernard Mandeville and Karl Marx.”

Despite the honey bee’s painful sting and the stereotype of insects as pests, bees are generally held in high regard. This is most likely due to their usefulness as pollinators and as producers of honey, their social nature, and their reputation for diligence. Bees are one of the few insects regularly used on advertisements, being used to illustrate honey and foods made with honey (such as Honey Nut Cheerios).

In ancient Egypt, the bee was seen to symbolize the lands of Lower Egypt, with the Pharaoh being referred to as “He of Sedge and Bee” (the sedge representing Upper Egypt).

In North Americayellow jackets and hornets, especially when encountered as flying pests, are often misidentified as bees, despite numerous differences between them.

Although a bee sting can be deadly to those with allergies, virtually all bee species are non-aggressive if undisturbed and many cannot sting at all. Humans are often a greater danger to bees, as bees can be affected or even harmed by encounters with toxic chemicals in the environment (see also bees and toxic chemicals).”

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bee

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