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Tag Archives | apiary

BORAGE: Beloved By Bees Everywhere -

“According to old wives’ tales, borage was sometimes smuggled into the drink of  prospective husbands to give them the courage to propose marriage.” -Mary Campbell, A Basket of Herbs

Borage is one of the very best bee plants. It’s an annual herb that prefers to be grown in full sun. The edible flowers have a delicate cucumber flavor and make a pretty garnish. 

Its nickname is “bee’s bread” because of its nectar-rich blue flowers. It refills with nectar every two minutes, which is amazingly fast. No wonder bees love it!

Borage has been cultivated since the 15th century. In folklore, this lovely herb was thought to bring courage to the heart. Whether in a border or in an herb garden, borage is a gift of love to your bees! 

[click here to read the original post on romancingthebee.com]

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VIDEO: by vkgoeswild

“I like the joke on the bumblebee;
His wings are too small to hold him.
He really can’t fly, professors agree
But nobody ever told him.”

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B-up!

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HAPPY VALENTINES DAY HONEYLOVERS ?!!

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Thanks so much to everyone who came out this weekend for our “How To Get Bees!!!” Workshop =)

Super fun as always!! YAY BEES ?

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Anyone interested in learning to be a beekeeper in Los Angeles needs to meet KIRK ANDERSON!!
He is the BEST MENTOR for urban beekeeping ?!! kirksurbanbees.combackwardsbeekeepers.com

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Hyack honeybees educate and pollinate

New Westminster Secondary School is a hive of activity these days, and not only because students are buzzing about the hallways, gearing up for second semester.

Four years ago this month, at the urging of his students, biology teacher Axel Krause approached the school board with a plan to build an apiary on the roof of the Pearson wing.

The plan was approved, and NWSS is now home to two beehives, with another shipment of bees on its way.

“It’s a unique kind of thing to our school,” said environment club president Isabel Sadowski, 17. “Not a lot of schools have beehives…”

“A hard part of being part of environment club is that sometimes your actions don’t really produce a lot,” said Sadowski. “You can raise awareness, you can change your own habits, but it’s hard to see the effect that you’re having. With the beehives, you can actually see the work you’ve been doing is creating something.”

But for Krause and Sadowski, bees are so much more important than the substances they produce.

“Every third mouthful of food you eat has had a bee involved,” said Krause, explaining that even dairy cows depend on bees to pollinate the alfalfa they eat. “It’s amazing how much food we eat that’s pollinated by bees. And the bees are dying.”

This month in California, one million beehives will arrive from all over the United States to pollinate over 700,000 acres of almonds. In the summer, many of those bees will be shipped to the Fraser Valley to pollinate blueberry crops, then to Alberta for canola.

Krause believes this practice may be a factor in Colony Collapse Disorder – the sudden loss of entire hives of bees that has plagued beekeepers since it was first documented in 2006.

“Do you like bananas?” asked Krause. “Do you want to eat bananas for two weeks straight? No. But that’s what we’re doing to our bees. We’re putting them into the almonds, and for two weeks all they get is almond pollen.”

Steady diets of a single kind of pollen, pesticides and viruses have contributed to the deaths of billions of bees in recent years, but Krause believes urban beekeeping is one solution…

[click here to read the full post on nwbeat.wordpress.com]

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MUSIC VIDEO: “Beekeeper’s Daughter” ?
by All American Rejects

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ARTICLE: San Diego deregulates urban agriculture

San Diego has joined the urban agriculture movement…

The changes bring San Diego in line with more progressive Northern California cities and toward the forefront of the urban agriculture movement sweeping the nation, backers of the revisions say.

“There were a lot of pretty prohibitive rules in the city of San Diego,” said Judy Jacoby, founder of the nonprofit San Diego Community Garden Network. “This is a big step forward.”

The changes came on a unanimous vote that Councilwoman Lorie Zapf called regulatory relief and Councilman Todd Gloria called common sense.

“It’s going to add to the quality of life in our city,” Gloria said after the Jan. 31 council session.

“As we become denser and more vertical in our communities, were going to need more opportunities to expand urban agriculture and grow our own food where we can,” Zapf said…

“We’re trying to bring San Diego into line with a lot of other cities,” Eric Robinson, of the 450-strong San Diego Beekeeping Society , told the City Council. “Humans have been beekeeping for 5,000 years. This is nothing new.”

…“It’s all part of the healthy food movement and also part of the food justice movement,” she said. “It’s the convergence of a lot of events, but there is an effort to make sure that more people have access to healthy, fresh food.”

[click here to read the full article on healthycal.org]

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