like Facebook follow Twitter watch YouTube subscribe RSS Feed
Archive | Yay Bees RSS feed for this section

WATCH: Urban Bee Keeping by Green Renaissance

Gardener’s Glory is Cape Town’s urban honey brand. Raw, untreated, unfiltered honey from Southern Suburb gardens.

[via greenrenaissance.co.za]

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

ARTICLE via The Onion: Beard of Bees

Bee Beard

BURLINGTON, VT—Complaining of patchiness and uneven color, area man Matthew Cruickshank, 34, told reporters Monday that he has always had trouble growing a full beard of bees. “For some reason, when the bees come in they just won’t connect my mustache to my goatee, and they seem to thin out halfway up my cheek,” said Cruickshank, examining a beeless patch of skin on his neck and noting how one random gray bee always appears in the middle of his chin. “It’s strange because my dad always had a full, thick beard of bees his whole life. I guess some guys are just lucky that way.” Cruickshank added that although he grooms his beard of bees frequently, it often becomes itchy and uncomfortable, especially at night when he’s trying to sleep.

[via theonion.com]

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

Honey Dipper Bottle

Honey Dipper Bottle

Honey Dipper Bottle via onekingslane.com

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

WATCH: Making a bee hotel

An animation showing you how easy it is to make a bee hotel. These will encourage solitary bees to your garden which are brilliant pollinators! Do it!

Filmed on a Nikon 300s by Alex Lanchester over 4 days in a dark shed!

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

Happy St. Gobnait’s Day!

St. Gobnait

St. Gobnait – Patron Saint of Bees and Beekeepers
The tall statue pictured above is of St. Gobnait in southwest Ireland (erected in the 1950s).
She appears with a nun’s habit standing on a bee hive surrounded by bees. [Featured art by sleekitbeastie]

 

“Saint Gobnait’s Day is Feb 11th is still celebrated by the community of Ballyvourney, in County Cork. During a Mass at the well, everyone takes water from it.

Gobnait (Gobnet, Gobhnet, Gobnaid, Gobnata, or Gobnatae), was born in County Clare, Ireland, sometime in the 5th or 6th century. Gobnait is Irish for Abigail (“Brings Joy”). As the patron saint of beekeepers, her name also has been anglicized as Deborah, meaning ‘Honey Bee’…

One of the miracles attributed to Saint Gobnait was that she protected a parish by unleashing a swarm of bees… She had a strong relationship with bees and used the properties of honey in the treatment of illness and healing of wounds.”

[via nbba.wordpress.com]

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

ARTICLE: San Francisco beekeeping

via baynature.org

Eye-level with the eucalyptus canopy of Golden Gate Park, Charlie Blevins stands on his San Francisco rooftop and begins to “suit up.”

He slips on a white jacket, then pulls a spacesuit- like hood over his head that masks his face with a netted veil. A pair of thick, white gloves drawn on and Blevins is ready for “inspection.” He gently pulls a honeycomb frame from the hive.

This is from one of 35 beehives that the San Franciscan beekeeper maintains in the backyards and rooftops of Bay Area properties. Is the queen laying eggs? Is the colony in tip-top shape? Are honey stores adequate? Blevins, a cheery and warm-hearted man in his late 50s, asks himself these questions as he checks each hive for signs of disease.

“You can tell a lot about the egg-laying pattern of the queen. If the queen is not laying, then the hive will die. Bees only live six weeks,” said Blevins.
Honeybee populations are in deep trouble around the world, but in places like San Francisco, urban beekeepers are doing their part to restore the enterprising Apis to their crucial role as ecosystem pollinator. Urban beekeeping is an outgrowth of the local food movement, which has inspired countless farms in urban pockets and has stoked the dream of sustainable cities. Behind every urban beehive is the beekeeper.

Queen Bee

Read the original article here: San Francisco beekeeping: the thrill of the hive

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

Bees and Math

Bees and Math

“Bees…by virtue of a certain geometrical forethought…know that the hexagon is greater than the square and the triangle, and will hold more honey for the same expenditure of material. — Pappus of Alexandria

Bees have not studied tessellations theory. However, some of their behavior patterns can be explained mathematically. One such phenomena which mother nature instilled in the bee is the nature to use the least expenditure of energy and materials. The bees somehow know that the square, the triangle and the hexagon are the only three self-tessellating regular polygons. Of the three, the hexagon has the smallest perimeter for a given area. So, when bees are constructing hexagonal prism cells in the hive, they use less wax and do less work to enclose the same space than if tessellating space with prisms of square or triangular bases. The honeycomb walls are made up of cells which are 1/80 of an inch thick, yet can support 30 times their own weight. A honeycomb of 14.5”x8.8” can hold more than five pounds of honey. That also explains why they are so heavy. The bees are creating hexagonal prisms in three rhombic sections, and the walls of the cell meet at exactly 120 degree angles. What is even more amazing, is the fact that the bees work simultaneously on different sections forming a comb with no visible seams. It is built vertically downward, and the bees use parts of their bodies as measuring instruments. In fact, their heads act as plummets.”

[view original post here]

http://thedeltacs.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/three-shapes.jpg

Click above to see some fun kids activities – one of which helps to illustrate why bees build hexagons via thedeltacs.com.

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

PATTERN: Bee Bonnet

PATTERN: Bee Bonnet Hat and Leg Warmers with lace via etsy

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

ARTICLE: Insecticide Unacceptable Danger

ARTICLE: Insecticide ‘unacceptable’ danger to bees, report finds

“Campaigners say the conclusion by the European Food Safety Authority is a ‘death knell’ for neonicotinoid pesticides

The world’s most widely used insecticide has for the first time been officially labelled an “unacceptable” danger to bees feeding on flowering crops. Environmental campaigners say the conclusion, by Europe’s leading food safety authority, sounds the “death knell” for the insect nerve agent…

Bees and other pollinators are critical to one-third of all food, but two major studies in March 2012, and others since, have implicated neonicotinoid pesticides in the decline in the insects, alongside habitat loss and disease. In April, the European commission demanded a re-examination of the risks posed by the chemicals, including Bayer’s widely used imidacloprid and two others…

“This is a major turning point in the battle to save our bees,” said Friends of the Earth’s Andrew Pendleton: ‘EFSA have sounded the death knell for one of the chemicals most frequently linked to bee decline and cast serious doubt over the safety of the whole neonicotinoid family. Ministers must wake up to the fact that these chemicals come with an enormous sting in the tail by immediately suspending the use of these pesticides.’”

[Click here to view the full article via guardian.co.uk]

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees

COMIC: I just wanted to dance

COMIC: “I… just wanted… to dance”

Read full story · Posted in Yay Bees